The Acquisition of Differential Object Marking

Editors
| INaLCO, Paris
| University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027205636 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027261090 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Differential Object marking (DOM), a linguistic phenomenon in which a direct object is morphologically marked for semantic and pragmatic reasons, has attracted the attention of several subfields of linguistics in the past few years. DOM has evolved diachronically in many languages, whereas it has disappeared from others; it is easily acquired by monolingual children, but presents high instability and variability in bilingual acquisition and language contact situations. This edited collection contributes to further our understanding of the nature and development of DOM in the languages of the world, in acquisition, and in language contact, variation, and change. The thirteen chapters in this volume present new empirical data from Estonian, Spanish, Turkish, Korean, Hindi, Romanian and Basque in different acquisition contexts and learner populations. They also bring together multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives to account for the complexity and dynamicity of this widespread linguistic phenomenon.
[Trends in Language Acquisition Research, 26]  2020.  vi, 369 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction: Differential Object Marking and its acquisition in different languages and contexts
Alexandru Mardale and Silvina Montrul
1–20
Chapter 1. Acquisition of symmetrical and asymmetrical Differential Object Marking in Estonian
Virve-Anneli Vihman, Anna L. Theakston and Elena Lieven
21–49
Chapter 2. Differential Object Marking in the speech of children learning Basque and Spanish
Jennifer R. Austin
51–75
Chapter 3. Differential Object Marking in simultaneous Hungarian-Romanian bilinguals
Larisa Avram and Veronica Tomescu
77–104
Chapter 4. The acquisition of Differential Object Marking in Basque as a sociolinguistic variable
Itxaso Rodríguez-Ordóñez
105–131
Chapter 5. The distribution of Differential Object Marking in L1 and L2 River Plate Spanish
Tiffany Judy and Michael Iverson
133–160
Chapter 6. On the acceptability of the Spanish DOM among Romanian-Spanish bilinguals
Julio César López Otero
161–181
Chapter 7. Animacy hierarchy effects on L2 processing of Differential Object Marking
Nuria Sagarra, Aurora Bel and Liliana Sánchez
183–206
Chapter 8. Verbal lexical frequency and DOM in heritage speakers of Spanish
Esther Hur
207–235
Chapter 9. The processing of Differential Object Marking by heritage speakers of Spanish
Begoña Arechabaleta Regulez
237–260
Chapter 10. Comprehension of Differential Object Marking by Hindi heritage speakers
Archna Bhatia and Silvina Montrul
261–281
Chapter 11. Differential Object Marking in Romanian as a heritage language
Silvina Montrul and Nicoleta Bateman
285–311
Chapter 12. Over-sensitivity to the animacy constraint on DOM in low proficient Turkish heritage speakers
Elif Krause and Leah Roberts
313–341
Chapter 13. Acquisition of Differential Object Marking in Korean
Eun Seon Chung
343–365
Index
367
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFDC – Language acquisition
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2020014059