Operationalizing Iconicity

Editors
| University of Cologne
| University of Amsterdam
| University of Zurich
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027205100 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027261410 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
The Iconicity in Language and Literature series has long been dedicated to the recognition and understanding of the pervasiveness of iconicity in language in its many forms and functions. The present volume, divided into four sections, brings together and unifies different perspectives on iconicity. Chapters in the first section (Iconicity in language) provide linguistic analyses of systems of iconic forms in different languages, across both space (areally) and time (diachronically). The second section (Iconicity in literature) is concerned with stylistic analyses of iconicity in literature, in both poetry and prose and across a range of devices and genres. The third section (Iconicity in visual media) highlights the use and effects of iconicity in pictorial, photographic and cinematic media. The final section (Iconicity in semiotic analysis) offers a theoretical perspective, targeting an operationalisation of iconicity with respect to the relationship between types and subtypes of Peircean signs.
[Iconicity in Language and Literature, 17]  2020.  xii, 331 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface and acknowledgements
vii–viii
Introduction
Pamela Perniss
x–xii
Part I. Iconicity in language
4–121
Modality-specificity of iconicity: The case of motion ideophones in Japanese
Kimi Akita
4–19
The relationship between iconicity and systematicity in Korean ideophones
Nahyun Kwon
22–38
Iconicity of Telugu ideophones and full word reduplications
Vasanta Duggirala and Lalita Murty
40–55
Morphosyntactic integration of ideophones in Japanese and Korean: A corpus-based analysis of spoken and written discourse
Ji-Yeon Park
58–73
Pathways of de-iconization: How borrowing, semantic evolution, and regular sound changes obscure iconicity
Maria Flaksman
76–103
System-internal and system-external phonic expressivity: Iconicity and Balkan affricates
Brian D. Joseph
106–121
Part II. Iconicity in literature
126–210
On the expressive and iconic value of enjambment from Homer to Milton
Paolo Dainotti
126–135
Language that thinks us: Iconicity and Christian Bök’s Eunoia
Julian Moyle
138–152
Levels of iconicity in classical and modern English-language haiku : An attempt at operationalization
Elżbieta Tabakowska
154–165
Salman Rushdie’s iconic syntax and its translation into French
Mariane Utudji
168–182
Heart without ‘the’: An iconic reading of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness
Xinxin Zhao
184–198
Crisscrossing James Joyce’s Ulysses : Chiasmus and cognition
Christina Ljungberg
200–210
Part III. Iconicity in visual media
214–289
Show me how you feel: Iconicity and systematicity in visual morphology
Lia N. Kendall, Quentin Raffaelli, Rebecca M. Todd, Alan Kingstone and Neil Cohn
214–229
In the kingdom of shadows: Towards a cognitive definition of photographic media
Piotr Sadowski
232–243
Iconicity in branding: A case of Japanese whiskey
Ayako Shibata
246–263
Resemblance metaphors and embodiment as iconic markers in medical understanding and communication by non-experts
Maribel Tercedor Sánchez and Antonio Jesús Láinez Ramos-Bossini
266–289
Part IV. Iconicity in semiotic analysis
294–326
The cognitive function of iconicity
Lucia Santaella
294–306
The iconic, indexical, and symbolic in language: Overlaps, inclusions, and exclusions
Winfried Nöth
308–326
INDEX
327
Subjects

Literature & Literary Studies

Theoretical literature & literary studies
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2019055126 | Marc record