Corpus Linguistics and African Englishes

Editors
| Benson Idahosa University
| University of Munster
| University of the Western Cape
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027202192 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027262936 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Corpus linguistics has become one of the most widely used methodologies across the different linguistic subdisciplines; especially the study of world-wide varieties of English uses corpus-based investigations as one of the chief methodologies. This volume comprises descriptions of the many new corpus initiatives both within and outside Africa that aim to compile various corpora of African Englishes. Moreover, it contains cutting-edge corpus-based research on African Englishes and the use of corpora in pedagogic contexts within African institutions. This volume thus serves both as a practical introduction to corpus compilation (Part I of the book), corpus-based research (Part II) and the application of corpora in language teaching (Part III), and is intended both for those researchers not yet familiar with corpus linguistics and as a reference work for all international researchers investigating the linguistic properties of African Englishes.
[Studies in Corpus Linguistics, 88]  2019.  ix, 403 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
Douglas Biber
Introduction: Corpus linguistics and African Englishes
Alexandra U. Esimaje, Ulrike Gut and Bassey E. Antia
2–4
Part I. Corpus linguistics and corpus building
8–182
Chapter 1.1. What is corpus linguistics?
Alexandra U. Esimaje and Susan Hunston
8–35
Chapter 1.2. Corpus-based research on English in Africa: A practical introduction
Robert Fuchs, Bertus van Rooy and Ulrike Gut
38–69
Chapter 1.3. The purpose, design and use of the Corpus of Nigerian and Cameroonian English Learner Language (Conacell)
Alexandra U. Esimaje
72–96
Chapter 1.4. Introducing a corpus of English(es) spoken in post-independence Namibia: Insights into corpus design and quantitative analyses
Helene Steigertahl
98–117
Chapter 1.5. The historical corpus of English in Ghana (HiCE Ghana): Motivation, compilation, opportunities
Thorsten Brato
120–141
Chapter 1.6. Addressing a coverage gap in African Englishes: The tagged corpus of Cameroon Pidgin English
Gabriel Ozón, Sarah FitzGerald and Melanie Green
144–164
Chapter 1.7. Practical corpus linguistics: Designing and exploiting a written corpus for research with special reference to Cameroon English
Daniel Nkemleke
166–182
Part II. Corpus-based analysis of African Englishes
186–328
Chapter 2.1. Evaluating explanations for past-time reference with unmarked verb forms in African Englishes
Bertus van Rooy
186–204
Chapter 2.2. The use of stance markers in West African Englishes
Ulrike Gut and Foluke Olayinka Unuabonah
206–229
Chapter 2.3. Namibian English on the web: Lexical and morphosyntactic features in a Corpus of Namibian Online Newspapers (CNamON)
Alexander Kautzsch
232–258
Chapter 2.4. Lexical expansion in Ghanaian English from a diachronic perspective: A structural and semantic analysis
Thorsten Brato
260–291
Chapter 2.5. Capturing the lexicon of Ugandan English: ICE-Uganda, its limitations, and effective complements
Bebwa Isingoma and Christiane Meierkord
294–328
Part III. Applications of corpora in English language teaching and learning
332–399
Chapter 3.1. A corpus-based analysis of conjunctive cohesion in English essays of Nigerian university learners
Adeyemi Iyabo
332–353
Chapter 3.2. African corpora for standards in African academic English: Case studies on prepositions
Josef J. Schmied
356–372
Chapter 3.3. Semiotic signature of transformation in a diachronic corpus of a South African political party
Bassey E. Antia and Tamsyn Hendricks
374–399
Index
401
Subjects
BIC Subject: CF/2AB – Linguistics/English
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018047817