Language Description Informed by Theory

Editors
| The University of Queensland
| The University of Queensland
| Griffith University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027206145 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027270917 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This volume explores how linguistic theories inform the ways in which languages are described. Theories, as representations of linguistic categories, guide the field linguist to look for various phenomena without presupposing their necessary existence and provide the tools to account for various sets of data across different languages. A goal of linguistic description is to represent the full range of language structures for any given language. The chapters in this book cover various sub-disciplines of linguistics including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, and anthropological linguistics, drawing upon theoretical approaches such as prosodic Phonology, Enhancement theory, Distributed Morphology, Minimalist syntax, Lexical Functional Grammar, and Kinship theory. The languages described in this book include Australian languages (Pama-Nyungan and non-Pama-Nyungan), Romance languages as well as English. This volume will be of interest to researchers in both descriptive and theoretical linguistics.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 147]  2014.  xii, 391 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Map of Australian languages refferred to in this book
vii
List of contributors
xi–xii
Editors’ introduction
Rob Pensalfini, Diana Guillemin and Myfany Turpin
1–14
Bibliography of Mary Laughren
Myfany Turpin and Diana Guillemin
15–24
Evaluating the Bilingual Education Program in Warlpiri schools
Samantha Disbray
25–46
Part 1. Phonology
Phonological aspects of Arandic baby talk
Myfany Turpin, Katherine Demuth and April Ngampart Campbell
49–80
Prestopping of nasals and laterals is only partly parallel
Erich Round
81–96
Part 2. Morphology
Liminal pronoun systems: Evidence from Garrwa
Ilana Mushin
99–122
Verbs as spatial deixis markers in Jingulu
Rob Pensalfini
123–152
The reconstruction of inflectional classes in morphology: History, method and Pama-Nyungan (Australian) verbs
Harold Koch
153–190
Part 3. Syntax
Marking Definiteness or Specificity, not necessarily both: Evidence of a principle of economy from Mauritian Creole
Diana Guillemin
193–216
Theory and experiment in parametric minimalism: The case of Romance negation
Giuseppe Longobardi
217–262
Serial verbs in Wambaya
Rachel Nordlinger
263–282
Nominals as adjuncts or arguments: Further evidence from language mixing
Felicity Meakins
283–316
Part 4. Semantics
The case of the invisible postman: The current status of the French future tense
Lynn Wales
319–336
Manner and result: A view from clean
Beth Levin and Malka Rappaport Hovav
337–358
Part 5. Anthropological Linguistics
Shifting relations: Structure and agency in the language of Bininj Gunwok kinship
Murray Garde
361–382
Language index
383–384
Subject index
385–392
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Verstraete, Jean-Christophe
2017. Umbuygamu. Journal of the International Phonetic Association  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 20 june 2019. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2013035715 | Marc record