Intercultural Perspectives on Research Writing

Editors
| Universidad de Zaragoza
| Vilnius University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027201973 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027263094 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This volume offers a fresh intercultural perspective on the discursive and rhetorical challenges non-Anglophone scholars face while writing and publishing in English for an international readership. The volume presents a wide spectrum of text-based intercultural analyses of academic texts written in L2 English. Placed in the context of a rapidly increasing role of English as the universal language of scientific and scholarly communication, the contributions attempt to explore native language influence on L2 English academic texts or, conversely, the influence of rhetorical or discursive features of English on L2 texts. Covering texts from Chinese to Lithuanian authors, the chapters in this volume offer a rich selection of lexico-grammatical, discursive and rhetorical elements analysed and compared across genres, disciplines and languages both within synchronic and diachronic perspectives. This volume will be of interest to both experienced and novice researchers in such fields as English for Academic Purposes, Intercultural Rhetoric, Genre Theory, Corpus Linguistics, and English as a Lingua Franca.
[AILA Applied Linguistics Series, 18]  2018.  x, 310 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface: Academic writing and non-Anglophone scholars
Ken Hyland
vii–x
Introduction: Intercultural rhetoric approaches to the analysis of academic genres
Pilar Mur-Dueñas and Jolanta Šinkūnienė
2–12
Part I. Three-fold intercultural analysis
16–79
Chapter 1. A contrastive (English, Czech English, Czech) study of rhetorical functions of citations in Linguistics research articles
Olga Dontcheva-Navrátilová
15–38
Chapter 2. How to internationalise and empower academic research?: The role of language and academic conventions in Linguistics
Jūratė Ruzaitė and Rūta Petrauskaitė
39–58
Chapter 3. The power of English: I and we in Lithuanian, Lithuanian English and British English research writing
Jolanta Šinkūnienė
59–80
Part II. Two-fold intercultural analysis
84–171
Chapter 4. “This dissonance”: Bolstering credibility in academic abstracts
Geneviève Bordet
83–104
Chapter 5. Asserting research status, values and relevance in thesis abstracts of Science and Engineering
Maryam Mehrjooseresht and Ummul K. Ahmad
105–128
Chapter 6. Chinese writers of English RAs as creators of a research space in a national context: A diachronic study
Xinren Chen
129–150
Chapter 7. Conference abstracts in English: A challenge for non-Anglophone writers
Renata Povolná
151–172
Part III. Intercultural analysis on the move
176–297
Chapter 8. Hybrid rhetorical structure in English Sociology research article abstracts: The ambit of ELF and translation
Rosa Lorés-Sanz
175–194
Chapter 9. Epistemic stance and authorial presence in scientific research writing: Hedges, boosters and self-mentions across disciplines and writer groups
Jingjing Wang and Feng (Kevin) Jiang
195–216
Chapter 10. Publishing in English: ELF writers, textual voices and metadiscourse
Marina Bondi and Carlotta Borelli
217–236
Chapter 11. Not the same, but how different?: Comparing the use of reformulation markers in ELF and in ENL research articles
Silvia Murillo
237–254
Chapter 12. Evaluation in research article introductions in the Social Sciences written by English as a Lingua Franca and English native users
Enrique Lafuente-Millán
255–276
Chapter 13. Exploring ELF manuscripts: An analysis of the anticipatory it pattern with an interpersonal function
Pilar Mur-Dueñas
277–298
Afterword: Intercultural rhetoric, English as a lingua franca and research writing
Ulla Connor
299–302
About the authors
303–306
Index
307
“This important collection of papers makes a significant and timely contribution to research on the intercultural dimension of research writing. Its thirteen authoritative chapters deal with the major genres (research article and abstract) and provide empirical analyses within a wide range of linguistic, cultural and disciplinary contexts. Given the ever-increasing pressure to publish in English, this volume will be essential reading not only for scholars working in the field of intercultural studies, but also for EAP professionals keen to develop their knowledge and understanding of the challenges faced by L2 writers of research genres.”
“This volume offers excellent insights into various forms of academic writing across cultures. The chapters provide in-depth perspectives on how scholars belonging to different contexts and disciplines cope with their need to communicate the results of their research at a global level by using the English language. This book makes an important contribution to the literature on Intercultural Rhetoric.”
Subjects
BIC Subject: CJCW – Writing skills
BISAC Subject: LAN020000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Study & Teaching
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018037090