The Constitution of Phenomenal Consciousness

Toward a science and theory

Editor
| Monash University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027213594 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027268785 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
Philosophers of mind have been arguing for decades about the nature of phenomenal consciousness and the relation between brain and mind. More recently, neuroscientists and philosophers of science have entered the discussion. Which neural activities in the brain constitute phenomenal consciousness, and how could science distinguish the neural correlates of consciousness from its neural constitution? At what level of neural activity is consciousness constituted in the brain and what might be learned from well-studied phenomena like binocular rivalry, attention, memory, affect, pain, dreams and coma? What should the science of consciousness want to know and what should explanation look like in this field? How should the constitution relation be applied to brain and mind and are other relations like identity, supervenience, realization, emergence and causation preferable? Building on a companion volume on the constitution of visual consciousness (AiCR 90), this volume addresses these questions and related empirical and conceptual territory. It brings together, for the first time, scientists and philosophers to discuss this engaging interdisciplinary topic.
[Advances in Consciousness Research, 92]  2015.  viii, 473 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
vii–viii
The constitution of visual and phenomenal consciousness: An introduction
Steven M. Miller
1–14
The scientific study of consciousness
Theories and methods in the scientific study of consciousness
P. Christiaan Klink, Matthew W. Self, Victor A.F. Lamme and Pieter R. Roelfsema
17–47
The scientific study of coma and related states
Vanessa Charland-Verville, Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Steven Laureys and Olivia Gosseries
48–80
De-confounding the neural constitution of phenomenal consciousness from attention, report and memory
Jeroen J.A. van Boxtel and Naotsugu Tsuchiya
81–103
The correlation/constitution distinction problem: Foundations, limits and explanation in consciousness science
Steven M. Miller
104–154
The neural correlates of consciousness: Causes, confounds and constituents
Jakob Hohwy and Tim Bayne
155–176
On the various neural correlates of consciousness: Are they distinguishable?
Tom A. de Graaf and Alexander T. Sack
177–204
On why the unconscious prerequisites and consequences of consciousness might derail us from unraveling the neural correlates of consciousness
Jaan Aru, Talis Bachmann, Wolf Singer and Lucia Melloni
205–225
The neuroevolutionary sources of mind: The ancestral constitution of affective consciousness and the core-SELF
Jaak Panksepp
226–259
The future of consciousness science: From empirical correlations to theoretical explanation
Antti Revonsuo
260–270
Philosophy of mind
The philosophy of phenomenal consciousness: An introduction
Zoe Drayson
273–292
The philosophy of mind needs a better metaphysics
Martin Mahner
293–309
The scientific evidence for materialism about pains
Andrew Melnyk
310–329
The status of consciousness in nature
Berit Brogaard
330–347
Identity over time, constitution and the problem of personal identity
Benjamin L. Curtis and Harold W. Noonan
348–371
Constitution, realization and identity: Empirical implications for three theories of the metaphysics of consciousness
Douglas Keaton
372–399
Correlation, causation, constitution: On the interplay between the science and philosophy of consciousness
Benjamin P. Kozuch and Uriah Kriegel
400–417
The material constitution of phenomenal consciousness
Derk Pereboom
418–432
Material constitution, the neuroscience of consciousness, and the temporality of experience
Benjamin L. Curtis
433–444
The structure of phenomenal consciousness
Jonathan P. Opie and Gerard J. O’Brien
445–464
Index
465–473
“This is the book for those of us who care about the scientific and philosophical debates, and associated empirical experiments, triggered by introduction twenty years ago of the concept of the 'neural correlates of consciousness'. It shows how this simple idea has evolved into something much more sophisticated and refined. The volume represents true progress in the scientific study of consciousness and on the ancient mind-body dilemma!”
“Miller has assembled a wonderful collection for anyone who wants an introduction or refresher on consciousness studies from both scientific and philosophic perspectives. Old hands and new faces combine for a comprehensive overview that also advances the debates in numerous ways.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Aru, Jaan & Talis Bachmann
2015. Still wanted—the mechanisms of consciousness!. Frontiers in Psychology 6 Crossref logo
Koch, Christof, Marcello Massimini, Melanie Boly & Giulio Tononi
2016. Neural correlates of consciousness: progress and problems. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17:5  pp. 307 ff. Crossref logo
Miller, Steven M.
2020. Fluctuations of consciousness, mood, and science: The interhemispheric switch and sticky switch models two decades on. Journal of Comparative Neurology 528:17  pp. 3171 ff. Crossref logo
Wong, William, Noreika, Valdas, Móró, Levente, Revonsuo, Antti, Windt, Jennifer, Valli, Katja & Tsuchiya, Naotsugu
2020. The Dream Catcher experiment: blinded analyses failed to detect markers of dreaming consciousness in EEG spectral power. Neuroscience of Consciousness 2020:1 Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 26 october 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Consciousness Research

Consciousness research
BIC Subject: JMM – Physiological & neuro-psychology, biopsychology
BISAC Subject: PSY020000 – PSYCHOLOGY / Neuropsychology
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014046964 | Marc record