Interdisciplinarity in Translation and Interpreting Process Research

Editors
| Zurich University of Applied Sciences
| Justus Liebig University Giessen
| Dublin City University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027242600 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027268488 | EUR 85.00 | USD 128.00
 
First published as a special issue of Target (issue 25:1, 2013), this volume explores interdisciplinarity in translation and interpreting process research, fields that have enjoyed a boom in the last decade. For this reason, the time was ripe for a reflection on the broad range of methodologies that have been applied in our endeavours to understand both translation and interpreting processes better. The ten chapters provide a snapshot of how translation and interpreting process researchers have availed themselves of concepts and theories developed in other disciplines, such as psychology, the cognitive sciences, journalism, and literary studies, to examine and illuminate their object of study. This collection demonstrates that translation and interpreting process research borrow heavily from other disciplines and call for a consideration of how translation research can become truly interdisciplinary through increased collaboration, synergy, and mutual advancement.
[Benjamins Current Topics, 72]  2015.  v, 159 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
1–3
Articles
The borrowers: Researching the cognitive aspects of translation
Sharon O'Brien
5–17
Cognitive load in simultaneous interpreting: Measures and methods
Kilian G. Seeber
18–33
Extended translation: A sociocognitive research agenda
Hanna Risku and Florian Windhager
35–47
Towards a new linguistic-cognitive orientation in translation studies
Juliane House
49–62
Translation competence: Explaining development and stagnation from a dynamic systems perspective
Susanne Göpferich
63–78
Applying a newswriting research approach to translation
Maureen Ehrensberger-Dow and Daniel Perrin
79–94
Metaphor in translation: Possibilities for process research
Christina Schäffner and Mark Shuttleworth
95–108
Investigating the conceptual-procedural distinction in the translation process: A relevance-theoretic analysis of micro and macro translation units
Fabio Alves and José Luiz Gonçalves
109–126
The role of archival and manuscript research in the investigation of translator decision-making
Jeremy Munday
127–140
Sound effects in translation
Inger M. Mees, Barbara Dragsted, Inge Gorm Hansen and Arnt Lykke Jakobsen
141–155
Subject index
157–159
“Interdisciplinarity strives to create new knowledge by integrating elements from different disciplines --methods, models, concepts-- in the service of a broader and more complete understanding of the complex phenomena scientists study. Interdisciplinarity also should act to challenge the "borders" of disciplines, to help scholars understand that complex phenomena like translation and interpreting can only be understood by moving deliberately into the space at the juncture of multiple disciplines. These noble goals are often touted, but not often achieved. This book, Interdisciplinarity in Translation and Interpreting Process Research, is a true and successful effort in interdisciplinarity. It successfully combines insights from cognitive science, psychology, sociology, neuro-linguistics, bilingualism and other fields to explore and, more importantly, expand the disciplinary boundaries of Translation Studies.”
“This volume provides an insightful and inspiring overview of the interdisciplinary work done in translation and interpreting process research. Individual contributions not only discuss what has been borrowed from other disciplines but also suggest promising areas for future collaboration and describe concrete examples of interdisciplinary research projects. Essential reading for anyone intrigued by the complexities of translation and interpreting.”
“The editors of this volume have brought together a body of high quality work that firmly establishes translation and interpreting process research and cognitive translation and interpreting studies as a locus of rapid development and innovation. Not only is the work forward-looking: it also clearly demonstrates that the interdisciplinarity cart is now firmly behind the translation and interpreting studies horse. This is clear throughout the volume as translational issues drive both theoretical and methodological advancement.”
“This volume [...] constitutes a valuable contribution to anyone interested in Interdisciplinarity and Translation Studies, even beyond Translation Process Research, mainly due to the richness of options provided. It may be treated as a methodological toolbox for a large variety of research occasions by both seasoned scholars and younger ones. What is more, this volume serves as an open invitation to scholars from other disciplines.”
“The maturity of process studies, and of translation studies at large, will ultimately give the translation process domain an equal status to other domains, and involve it in truly reciprocal interdisciplinary partnerships. This book takes an important step in that direction.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

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2015.  In Describing Cognitive Processes in Translation [Benjamins Current Topics, 77],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Chen, Sijia
2020. The process of note-taking in consecutive interpreting. Interpreting. International Journal of Research and Practice in Interpreting 22:1  pp. 117 ff. Crossref logo
Deckert, Mikołaj
2017. Asymmetry and automaticity in translation. Translation and Interpreting Studies 12:3  pp. 469 ff. Crossref logo
Deckert, Mikołaj
2019. Séverine Hubscher-Davidson. Translation and Emotion: A Psychological Perspective . Target. International Journal of Translation Studies 31:2  pp. 277 ff. Crossref logo
Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
2018.  In A History of Modern Translation Knowledge [Benjamins Translation Library, 142],  pp. 293 ff. Crossref logo
Lyu, Qi & Shuhuai Wang
2018. Translation and emotion: A psychological perspective. Perspectives 26:6  pp. 946 ff. Crossref logo
Muñoz, Edinson, Noelia Calvo & Adolfo M. García
2019. Grounding translation and interpreting in the brain: what has been, can be, and must be done. Perspectives 27:4  pp. 483 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 26 april 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Interpreting
Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2015009723