Perspectives on Language Structure and Language Change

Studies in honor of Henning Andersen

Editors
| University of Copenhagen
| University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)
| The Ohio State University
| University of Copenhagen
| University of Copenhagen
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027203090 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027262639 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This volume centers on three important theoretical concepts for the study of language change and the ways in which language structure emerges and turns into new structure: reanalysis, actualization, and indexicality. Reanalysis is a part of ongoing everyday language use, a process through which language is reproduced and changed. Actualization refers to the processes through which a reanalyzed structure spreads throughout single communities and society. Indexicality covers the way in which parts of a linguistic system can point to other parts of the system, both syntagmatically and paradigmatically. The inclusion of indexicality leads to fine-grained analysis in morphology, word order, and constructional syntax.
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 345]  2019.  ix, 419 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
ix
Perspectives on language structure and language change: An introduction
Lars Heltoft, Iván Igartua, Brian D. Joseph, Kirsten Jeppesen Kragh and Lene Schøsler
1–10
Part I. On the theory of language change
13–122
Andersen (1973) and dichotomies of change
Hope C. Dawson and Brian D. Joseph
13–34
Induction and tradition: “As time goes by …” – Play it again!
Ole Nedergaard Thomsen
35–79
Approaching the typology and diachrony of morphological reversals
Iván Igartua
81–106
Deconstructing markedness in sound change typology: Notes on θ > f and f > θ
Juliette Blevins
107–122
Part II. Indexicality
125–178
Diachronic morphology, indexical function and a critique of the morphome analysis: The content and expression of Danish forstå
Peter Juul Nielsen
125–150
Word order as grammaticalised semiotic systems
Lars Heltoft
151–178
Part III. Problems of reanalysis
181–324
Anticausative and passive in Vedic: Which way reanalysis?
Hans Henrich Hock
181–191
Grammaticalization and degrammati(calizati)on in the development of the Iranian verb system
Vit Bubenik
193–204
Aspects of grammaticalization and reanalysis in the voice domain in the transition from Latin to early Italo-Romance
Michela Cennamo
205–231
From preverbal to postverbal in the early history of Japanese
Bjarke Frellesvig
233–251
Reanalysis in the Russian past tense: The gerundial perfect
Jan Ivar Bjornflaten
253–270
From a single lexical unit to multiple grammatical paradigms
Kirsten Jeppesen Kragh and Lene Schøsler
271–294
Morphosyntactic reanalysis in Australian languages: Three studies
Harold Koch
295–309
Definiteness in Germanic and Balto-Slavic: Historical and comparative perspectives
John Ole Askedal
311–324
Part IV. Actualization
325–356
Diatopy and frequency as indicators of spread: Accentuation in Bulgarian dialects
Ronelle Alexander
325–344
Suppletion or illusion?: The diachrony of suppletive derivation
Johanna Nichols
345–356
Part V. Language change and diachronic typology in Balto-Slavic
359–409
A complicated relationship: Balto-Slavic accentual mobility as a non-trivial shared innovation
Thomas Olander
359–380
Name-calling: The Russian ‘new Vocative’ and its status
Laura A. Janda
381–394
Changes of tense and modality in Late Mediaeval Slovene: Transference, extension or both?
Jadranka Gvozdanović
395–409
Index
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2019002800 | Marc record