Conversation Analysis and Language Alternation

Capturing transitions in the classroom

Editors
| Monash University
| University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027201409 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027263575 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
This volume brings together researchers in conversation analysis who examine the practice of alternating between English and German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish and Vietnamese in the classroom. The collection shows that language alternation is integral to being and learning to become a bilingual, and that being and learning to become a bilingual are accomplished through a remarkably common set of interactional objects and actions, whose sequential organisations are quite similar across languages and educational sectors. This volume therefore shows that having recourse to more than one shared language provides an important resource for getting the work of language learning and teaching done through an orderliness that can be described and evaluated. The findings and the suggested pedagogical applications described in the volume will be of significant interest to researchers and teachers in a range of fields including second and foreign language teaching and learning, conversation analysis, teacher education and bilingualism.

[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 295]  2018.  ix, 263 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii
Notations used in the transcripts
ix
Part I. Overview
1–57
Chapter 1. Transitions in the language classroom as important sites for language alternation
Anna Filipi and Numa Markee
3–14
Chapter 2. Analysing bilingual talk: Conversation analysis and language alternation
Nigel Musk and Jakob Cromdal
15–34
Chapter 3. Overall order versus local order in bilingual conversation: A conversation analytic perspective on language alternation
Joseph Gafaranga
35–58
Part II. Language alternation in the language classroom
61–201
Chapter 4. Language alternation in peer interaction in content and language integrated learning (CLIL)
Tom Morton and Natalia Evnitskaya
61–82
Chapter 5. What is it in Swedish?: Translation requests as a resource for vocabulary explanation in English mother tongue instruction
Kirsten Stoewer
83–106
Chapter 6. L1/L2 alternation practices in students’ task planning
Silvia Kunitz
107–128
Chapter 7. Transitions with “Okay”: Managing language alternation in role-play preparations
Tetyana Reichert and Grit Liebscher
129–148
Chapter 8. Recurring patterns of language alternation practices by EFL novice teachers in Vietnam
Hoang Thi Giang Lam
149–164
Chapter 9. Language alternation during L2 classroom discussion tasks
Huong Quynh Tran
165–182
Chapter 10. Making teacher talk comprehensible through language alternation practices
Anna Filipi
183–202
Part III. Conclusions
205–223
Chapter 11. From research to applications: Pedagogical considerations in language alternation practices
Anna Filipi and Numa Markee
205–223
References
225–254
Author index
255–258
Subject index
259–263
References

References

Adams, Raymond S., and David Chen
1981The Process of Educational Innovation: An International Perspective. London: Kogan Page/UNESCO Press.Google Scholar
Alegría de la Colina, Ana, and Maria del Pilar García Mayo
2009 “Oral Interaction in Task-Based EFL Learning: The Use of the L1 as a Cognitive Tool.” International Review of Applied Linguistics 47: 325–345. Crossref.Google Scholar
Alfonzetti, Giovanna
1998 “The Conversational Dimension in Code-Switching Between Italian and Dialect in Sicily.” In Code-Switching in Conversation: Language, Interaction, and Identity, ed. by Peter Auer, 180–214. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Alvarez-Caccamo, Celso
1998 “From ‘Switching Code’ to ‘Code-switching’: Towards a Reconceptualisation of Communicative Codes.” In Code-switching in Conversation, ed. by Peter Auer, 29–48. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Amir, Alia
2013 “Self-policing in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom.” Novitas-ROYAL 7 (2): 84–105.Google Scholar
Amir, Alia, and Nigel Musk
2013 “Language Policing: Micro-level Language Policy-in-process in the Foreign Language Classroom.” Classroom Discourse 4 (2): 151–167.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2014 “Pupils Doing Language Policy: Micro-interactional Insights from the English as a Foreign Language Classroom.” Journal of Applied Language Studies 8 (2): 93–113.Google Scholar
Anderson, Terry, and Julie Shattuck
2012 “Design-based Research: A Decade of Progress in Educational Research?Educational Researcher 41 (1): 16–25.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Antaki, Charles
2011 “Six Kinds of Applied Conversation Analysis”. In Applied Conversation Analysis: Intervention and Change in Institutional Talk, ed. by Charles Antaki, 1–14. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Antón, Marta
2015 “Shifting Trends in the Assessment of Classroom Interaction.” In The Handbook of Classroom Discourse and Interaction, ed. by Numa Markee, 74–89. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Antón, Marta, and Frederick DiCamilla
1999 “Socio-cognitive Functions of L1 Collaborative Interaction in the L2 Classroom.” The Modern Language Journal 83: 233–247.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Atkinson, David
1993Teaching Monolingual Classes. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Atkinson, J. Maxwell, and John Heritage
(eds) 1984Structures of Social Action. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Auer, Peter
1984Bilingual Conversation. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1988 “A Conversation Analytic Approach to Codeswitching and Transfer.” In Codeswitching: Anthropological and Sociolinguistic Perspectives, ed. by Monica Heller, 187–213. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, (Reprinted in Li Wei (ed) 2000 The Bilingualism Reader, 166–187. London: Routledge).CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1991 “Bilingualism in and as Social Action: A Sequential Approach to Code-switching.” European Science Foundation Papers for the Symposium on Code-switching in Bilingualism, 2: 319–352.Google Scholar
1992 “Introduction: John Gumperz’ Approach to Contextualization”. In The Contextualization of Language, ed. by Peter Auer and Aldo di Luzio, 1–37. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1995 “The Pragmatics of Code-switching: A Sequential Approach.” In One Speaker Two Languages: Cross-disciplinary Perspectives on Code-switching, ed. by Lesley Milroy and Pieter Muysken, 115–135. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1998 “Introduction: Bilingual Conversation Revisited.” In Code-switching in Conversation, ed. by Peter Auer, 1–28. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
1999 “From Codeswitching Via Language Mixing to Fused Lects: Toward a Dynamic Typology of Bilingual Speech.” International Journal of Bilingualism 3 (4): 309–332.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2000a “A Conversation-Analytic Approach to Code-Switching and Transfer.” In The Bilingualism Reader, ed. by Li Wei, 154–174. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2000b “Why Should We and How Can We Determine the “Base Language” of a Bilingual Conversation?Estudios de Sociolinguistica 1: 129–144.Google Scholar
Australian Professional Standards for Teachers
Bakhtin, Mikhail M.
1981Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays, ed. by Michael Holquist. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Baoueb, Lamia B.
2009 “Social Factors for Code-switching in Tunisian Business Companies: A Case Study.” Multilingua–Journal of Cross-Cultural and Interlanguage Communication 28 (4): 425–458.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Barook, Anette
2010 “Bilingual Children and Code-switching.” Doctoral thesis, Malmö University, Sweden. http://​hdl​.handle​.net​/2043​/12020.
Barraja-Rohan, Anne-Marie
1997 “Teaching Conversation and Sociocultural Norms with Conversation Analysis.” Australian Review of Applied Linguistics, Series S 14: 71–88.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011 “Using Conversation Analysis in the Second Language Classroom to Teach Interactional Competence.” Language Teaching Research 15 (4): 479–507.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Barraja-Rohan, Anne-Marie, and Ruth Pritchard
1997Beyond Talk: A Course in Communication and Conversation for Intermediate Adult Learners of English. Footscray, Vic: Western Melbourne Institute of TAFE.Google Scholar
Barske, Tobias
2009 “Same Token, Different Actions: A Conversation Analytic Study of Social Roles, Embodied Actions, and Ok in German Business Meetings.” Journal for Business Communication: Special Issue on Meeting Talk 46 (1): 120–149.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Barske, Tobias, and Andrea Golato
2010 “German So: Managing Sequence and Action.” Text and Talk 30 (3): 245–266.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Beach, Wayne A.
1993 “Transitional Regularities for ‘Casual’ “Okay” Usages.” Journal of Pragmatics 19: 325–352.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1995 “Conversation Analysis: “Okay” as a Clue for Understanding Consequentiality.” In The Consequentiality of Communication, ed. by Stuart J. Sigman, 121–162. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Behan, Laurie, Miles Turnbull, and Jane Spek
1997 “The Proficiency Gap in Late Immersion (Extended French): Language Use in Collaborative Tasks.” Le Journal de l’Immersion 20: 41–42.Google Scholar
Belhiah, Hassan
2013 “Using the Hand to Choreograph Instruction: On the Functional Role of Gesture in Definition Talk.” The Modern Language Journal 97 (2): 417–434.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Betz, Emma M., and Thorsten Huth
2014 “Beyond Grammar: Teaching Interaction in the German Classroom.” Unterrichtspraxis/Teaching German 47 (2): 140–163.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Björk-Willén, Polly, and Jakob Cromdal
2009 “When Education Seeps into “Free Play”: How Preschool Children Accomplish Multilingual Education.” Journal of Pragmatics 8, 1493–1518. Crossref.Google Scholar
Blom, Jan-Petter, and John J. Gumperz
1972 “Social Meaning in Linguistic Structure: Code-switching in Norway.” In Directions in Sociolinguistics, ed. by John J. Gumperz and Dell Hymes, 407–434. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
Bolden, Gallina
2016 “A Simple Da? Affirming Responses to Polar Questions in Russian Conversation.” In Special Issue: Alignment and Affiliation in Responding Actions, ed. by Hiroko Tanaka, Seung-Hee Lee and Kang Kwong Luke, Journal of Pragmatics 100: 40–58.Google Scholar
Bonacina, Florence
2010 “A Conversation Analytic Approach to Practised Language Policies: The Example of an Induction Classroom for Newly-arrived Immigrant Children in France.” Doctoral thesis, University of Edinburgh.Google Scholar
Bonacina-Pugh, Florence
2012 “Researching ‘Practiced Language Policies’: Insights from Conversation Analysis.” Language Policy 11: 213–234.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bonacina, Florence, and Joseph Gafaranga
2011 “ ‘Medium of Instruction’ vs. ‘Medium of Classroom Interaction’: Language Choice in a French Complementary School Classroom in Scotland.” International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 14 (3): 319–334. Crossref.Google Scholar
Borevi, Karin
2002 “Välfärdsstaten i Det Mångkulturella Samhället [The Welfare State in Multicultural Society].” Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 151. Doctoral thesis, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Uppsala Universitet.Google Scholar
Bowles, Hugo
2006 “Bridging the Gap Between Conversation Analysis and ESP – An Applied Study of the Opening Sequences of NS and NNS Service Telephone Calls.” English for Specific Purposes 25: 332–357.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012 “Analyzing Languages for Specific Purposes Discourse.” The Modern Language Journal 96: 42–58. Crossref.Google Scholar
Bowles, Hugo, and Paul Seedhouse
(eds) 2007Conversation Analysis and Language for Specific Purposes. Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Boyd, Elizabeth, and John Heritage
2006 “Taking the History: Questioning During Comprehensive History-taking.” In Communication in Medical Care, ed. by John Heritage and Douglas W. Maynard, 151–184. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Broner, Maggie A., and Diane J. Tedick
2011 “Talking in the Fifth-grade Classroom: Language Use in an Early, Total Spanish Immersion Program.” In Immersion Education: Practices, Policies, Possibilities, ed. by Diane J. Tedick, Donna Christian and Tara W. Fortune, 166–187. Bristol, UK: Multilingual MattersGoogle Scholar
Brookhart, Susan M.
2009Exploring Formative Assessment. USA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.Google Scholar
Broth, Mathias, and Lorenza Mondada
2013 “Walking Away: The Embodied Achievement of Activity Closings in Mobile Interaction.” Journal of Pragmatics 47 (1): 41–58.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Brouwer, Catherine E.
2003 “Word Searches in NNS : NS Interaction: Opportunities for Language Learning?The Modern Language Journal 87 (4): 534–545.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Burch, Alfred R.
2014 “Pursuing Information: A Conversation Analytic Perspective on Communication Strategies.” Language Learning 64: 651–684. Crossref.Google Scholar
Burns, Anne
2005Collaborative Action Research for English Language Teachers. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Butzkamm, Wolfgang
1998 “Code-switching in a Bilingual History Lesson: The Mother Tongue as a Conversational Lubricant.” International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 1 (2): 81–89.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bygate, Martin, Peter Skehan, and Merrill Swain
2001Research Pedagogic Tasks: Second Language Learning, Teaching, and Testing. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Canagarajah, Suresch A.
1995 “Functions of Codeswitching in ESL Classrooms: Socialising Bilingualism in Jaffna.” Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 16 (3): 173–195. Crossref.Google Scholar
2002Critical Academic Writing and Multilingual Students. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Canagarajah, Suresh A.
2007 “Lingua Franca English, Multilingual Communities, and Language Acquisition.” The Modern Language Journal 91: 923–939.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Carless, David R.
1999a “Large-scale Curriculum Change in Hong Kong.” In Exploring Change in English Language Teaching, ed. by Chris Kennedy, Paul Doyle and Christine Goh, 19–28. Oxford, UK: Macmillan.Google Scholar
1999b “Perspectives on the Cultural Appropriacy of Hong Kong’s Target-Oriented Curriculum (TOC) Initiative.” Language, Culture and Curriculum 12: 238–254.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2004 “Issues in Teachers’ Reinterpretation of a Task-Based Innovation in Primary Schools.” TESOL Quarterly 38: 639–662.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Carter, Ronald, and Michael McCarthy
(eds) 1988Vocabulary and Language Teaching. New York, NY: Longman.Google Scholar
Cenoz, Jasone, and Durk Gorter
2011 “Focus on Multilinguals: A Study of Trilingual Writing.” The Modern Language Journal 95: 356–369.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Chaudron, Craig
1982 “Vocabulary Elaboration in Teachers’ Speech to L2 Learners.” Studies in Second Language Acquisition 4 (2): 170–180. Crossref.Google Scholar
Cheng, Tsui-Ping
2013 “Codeswitching and Participant Orientations in a Chinese as a Foreign Language Classroom.” The Modern Language Journal 97 (4): 869–886. Crossref.Google Scholar
2014 “The Interactional Achievements of Repair and Correction in a Mandarin Language Classroom.” Chinese as a Second Language Research 3 (2): 175–200.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2016 “Authentic L2 Interactions as Material for a Pragmatic Awareness-Raising Activity.” Language Awareness 25 (3): 159–178. Crossref.Google Scholar
Clark, Brendan, and Karl Lindemalm
2011Språkskap. Swedish as a Social Language. Sweden: Folkuniversitetet & Interactive Institute.Google Scholar
Clyne, Michael
1967Transference and Triggering. The Hague: Nijhoff.Google Scholar
2003Dynamics of Language Contact: English and Immigrant Languages. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Conteh, Jean
2012Teaching Bilingual and EAL Learners in Primary Schools. London: Learning Matters.Google Scholar
Cook, Vivian J.
2001 “Using the First Language in the Classroom.” Canadian Modern Language Review 57 (3): 402–423.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005 “Basing Teaching on the L2 User.” In Non-native Language Teachers: Perceptions, Challenges and Contributions to the Profession, ed. by Enric Llurda, 47–61. New York, NY: Springer.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2006 “Interlanguage, Multi-competence and the Problem of the ‘Second’ Language.” Rivista di Psicolinguistica Applicata VI (3): 39–52.Google Scholar
Coulter, Jeff
1989Mind in Action. Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press International.Google Scholar
Council of Europe
2001The Common European Framework Reference for Languages: Learning Teaching, Assessment. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Couper-Kuhlen, Elizabeth
2007 “Assessing and Accounting.” In Reporting Talk: Reported Speech in Interaction, ed. by Elizabeth Holt and Rebecca Clift, 81–119. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
2012 “Some Truths and Untruths About Final Intonation in Conversational Questions.” In Questions: Formal, Functional and Interactional Perspectives, ed. by Jan-Peter de Ruiter, 123–145. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Creese, Angela, and Adrian Blackledge
2010 “Translanguaging in the Bilingual Classroom: A Pedagogy for Learning and Teaching?The Modern Language Journal 94 (1): 103–115.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Creese, Angela, Adrian Blackledge, Taşkin Baraç, Arvind Bhatt, Shahela Hamid, Li Wei, Vally Lytra, Peter W. Martin, Chao-Jung Wu, and Dilek Yağcioğlu
2011 “Separate and Flexible Bilingualism in Complementary Schools: Multiple Language Practices in Interrelationship.” Journal of Pragmatics 43 (5): 1196–1208. Crossref.Google Scholar
Cromdal, Jakob
2000 “Code-switching for all Practical Purposes: Bilingual Organization of Children’s Play.” Doctoral thesis, Linköping University.Google Scholar
2001 “ Can I be With?: Negotiating Play Entry in a Bilingual School.” Journal of Pragmatics 33 (4): 515–543. Crossref.Google Scholar
2003 “The Creation and Administration of Social Relations in Bilingual Group Work.” Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 24: 56–75.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2004 “Building Bilingual Oppositions: Code-switching in Children’s Disputes.” Language in Society 33: 33–58.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005 “Bilingual Order in Collaborative Word Processing: On Creating an English Text in Swedish.” Journal of Pragmatics 37: 329–353.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2013 “Bilingual and Second-language Interactions: Views from Scandinavia.” International Journal of Bilingualism 17: 121–131.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cromdal, Jakob, and Karin Aronsson
2000 “Footing in Bilingual Play.” Journal of Sociolinguistics 4: 435–457. Crossref.Google Scholar
Cummins, Jim
2007 “Rethinking Monolingual Instructional Strategies in Multilingual Classrooms.” Canadian Journal of Applied Linguistics/La Revue Canadienne de Linguistique Appliquée 10 (2): 221–240.Google Scholar
Dailey-O’Cain, Jennifer, and Grit Liebscher
2009 “Teacher and Student Use of the First Language in Foreign Language Classroom Interaction: Functions and Applications.” In First Language Use in Second and Foreign Language Learning, ed. by Miles Turnbull and Jennifer Dailey-O’Cain, 131–144. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Dalton-Puffer, Christiane
2007Discourse in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) Classrooms. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011 “Content-and-language Integrated Learning: From Practice to Principles?Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 31: 182–204.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dang, Thi Kim Anh, Hoa Thi Mai Nguyen, and Truc Thi Thanh Le
2013 “The Impacts of Globalsiation on EFL Teacher Education Through English as a Medium of Instruction: An Example from Vietnam.” Current Issues in Language Planning 14 (1): 52–72. Crossref.Google Scholar
Deppermann, Arnulf
2013a “How to Get a Grip on Identities-in-interaction: (What) Does ‘Positioning’ Offer More Than ‘Membership Categorization’? Evidence from a Mock Story.” In Narrative Inquiry, ed. by Michael Bamberg, 62–88. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.Google Scholar
2013b “Turn-design at Turn-beginnings: Multimodal Resources to Deal with Tasks of Turn-construction in German.” Journal of Pragmatics 46: 91–121.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dewaele, Jean-Marc
2013Emotions in Multiple Languages (2nd ed.). Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Die Unterrichtspraxis/Teaching German 2014 47 (2).Google Scholar
Donato, Richard
2004 “Aspects of Collaboration in Pedagogical Discourse.” Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 24: 284–302.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Drew, Paul
2013 “Turn Design.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 131–149. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Duff, Patricia A., and Tim Anderson
2015 “Academic Language and Literacy Socialization for Second Language Students.” In The Handbook of Classroom Discourse and Interaction, ed. by Numa, Markee, 337–352. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Duff, Patricia A., and Charlene G. Polio
1990 “How Much Foreign Language is There in the Foreign Language Classroom?The Modern Language Journal 74 (2): 154–166.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
D’warte, Jacqueline
2014 “Exploring Linguistic Repertoires: Multiple Language Use and Multimodal Literacy Activity in Five Classrooms.” Australian Journal of Language and Literacy 37 (1): 21–30.Google Scholar
Edwards, Derek
1997Discourse and Cognition. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Ehsan, Rezvani, and Abbass Razekh
2011 “Code-switching in Iranian Elementary EFL Classrooms: An Exploratory Investigation.” English Language Teaching 4 (1): 18–25.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Eldridge, John
1996 “Code Switching in a Turkish Secondary School.” ELT Journal 50 (4): 303–311. Crossref.Google Scholar
Elliott, John
1991Action Research for Educational Change. Philadelphia, PA: Open University PressGoogle Scholar
Ellis, Rod
1999Learning a Second Language Through Interaction. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012Language Teaching Research and Language Pedagogy. Oxford, UK: John Wiley and Son.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Escobar Urmeneta, Cristina, and Natalia Evnitskaya
2014 “ ‘Do You Know Actimel?’ The Adaptive Nature of Dialogic Teacher-led Discussions in the CLIL Science Classroom: A Case Study.” The Language Learning Journal Special Issue: Content and Language Integrated Learning 42 (2): 165–180.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Eskildsen, Søren W., and Numa Markee
. 2018. “L2 talk as Social Accomplishment.” In Speaking in a Second Language ed. by Rosa Alonso Alonso. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
Fagan, Drew
2012 “Okay as a Multifunctional Resource for Giving Feedback in Classrooms”. Language & Information Society 16. 9–41.Google Scholar
Farrell, Thomas S. C.
2008Novice Language Teachers: Insights and Perspectives for the First Year. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
2015Promoting Reflection in Second Language Education: A Framework for TESOL Professionals. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Félix-Brasdefer, César J.
2006 “Teaching the Negotiation of Multi-turn Speech Acts: Using Conversation-analytic Tools to Teach Pragmatics in the FL Classroom.” In Pragmatics and Language Learning, volume 11, ed. by Kathleen Bardovi-Harlig, César Félix-Brasdefer and Alwiya Omar, 165–196. Honolulu: National Foreign Language Resource Center, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.Google Scholar
Ferguson, Charles A.
1978 “Multilingualism as Object of Linguistic Description.” In Linguistics in the Seventies: Directions and Prospects, Special Issue of Studies in Linguistic Sciences, ed. by Braj Kachru. 8 (2): 97–105. Urbana, ILL: Department of Linguistics, University of Illinois.Google Scholar
Ferguson, Gibson
2003 “Classroom Code-switching in Post-colonial Contexts: Functions, Attitudes and Policies.” AILA Review 16: 38–51. Crossref.Google Scholar
2009 “What Next? Towards an Agenda for Classroom Codeswitching Research.” International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 12 (2): 231–241.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Filipi, Anna
1993 “Interaction or Interrogation? A Study of Talk Occurring in a Sample of the 1992 VCE Italian Oral Common Assessment Task.” Master’s thesis, University of Melbourne.Google Scholar
1994 “Interaction in an Italian Oral Test: The Role of Some Expansion Sequences.” In Spoken Interaction Studies in Australia. Australian Review of Applied Linguistics, Special Issue, ed. by Rod Gardner. Australian Review of Applied Linguistics Series S 11: 119–136.Google Scholar
2001 “The Organisation of Pointing Sequences in Parent-Toddler Interaction.” Doctoral thesis, Monash University.Google Scholar
2007 “A Toddler’s Treatment of mm and mm hm in Talk with a Parent.” Australian Review of Applied Linguistics 30 (3): 33.31–33.17.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2009Toddler and Parent Interaction: The Organisation of Gaze, Pointing and Vocalisation. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2013 “Withholding and Pursuit in the Development of Skills in Interaction and Language.” Interaction Studies 14 (2): 139–159.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2015a “Authentic Interaction and Examiner Accommodation in the IELTS Speaking Test: A Discussion.” Papers in Language Testing and Assessment 4 (2): 1–17.Google Scholar
2015b “The Development of Recipient Design in Bilingual Child-parent Interaction.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 48 (1): 100–119. Crossref.Google Scholar
2018a “Making Knowing Visible: Tracking the Development of the Response Token Yes in Second Turn Position.” In Longitudinal Studies in Conversation Analysis, ed. by Simona Pekarek Doehler, Johannes Wagner and Esther González-Martinez. 39–66. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
. [2018b] “Teacher Practices in Establishing Understanding in a Foreign Language Classroom.” Conversation Analytic Studies on Teaching and Learning Practices: International Perspectives. Special Issue, Hacettepe University Journal of Education. 33: 36–53.
Filipi, Anna, and Anne-Marie Barraja-Rohan
2015 “An Interaction-focused Pedagogy Based on Conversation Analysis for Developing L2 Pragmatic Competence.” In Teaching, Learning and Investigating about Pragmatics: Principles, Methods and Practices, ed. by Sarah Gesuato, Francesca Bianchi and Winnie Cheng, 231–252. UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
Firth, Alan, and Johannes Wagner
1997 “On Discourse, Communication, and (Some) Fundamental Concepts in SLA Research.” The Modern Language Journal 81: 285–300. Crossref.Google Scholar
2007 “Second/foreign Language Learning as a Social Accomplishment: Elaborations on a Reconceptualized SLA.” The Modern Language Journal 91: 798–817. Crossref.Google Scholar
Flavell, John
1979 “Metacognition and Cognitive Monitoring.” American Psychologist 34 (10): 906–911.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Flyman-Mattsson, Anna, and Niclas Burenhult
1999 “Code-switching in Second Language Teaching of French.” Working Papers 47: 59–72.Google Scholar
Fraser, Bruce
2006 “Towards a Theory of Discourse Markers.” In Approaches to Discourse Particles, ed. by Kerstin Fischer, 189–204. Amsterdam: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Frith, Chris D.
2012 “The Role of Metacognition in Human Social Interactions.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 367 (1599): 2213–2223. Crossref.Google Scholar
Frohlich, Maria, Nina Spada, and Patrick Allen
1985 “Differences in the Communicative Orientations of L2 Classrooms.” TESOL Quarterly 19 (1): 27–57.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Fuller, Janet M.
2009 “How Bilingual Children Talk: Strategic Codeswitching among Children in Dual Language Programs.” In First Language Use in Second and Foreign Language Learning, ed. by Miles Turnbull and Jennifer Dailey-O’Cain, 115–130. Bristol, Buffalo, Toronto: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Gafaranga, Joseph
1998 “Elements of Order in Bilingual Talk: Kinyarwanda-French Language Alternation.” Doctoral thesis, Lancaster University.Google Scholar
1999 “Language Choice as a Significant Aspect of Talk Organisation: The Orderliness of Language Alternation.” Text: Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of Discourse 19 (2): 201–226. Crossref.Google Scholar
2000 “Medium Repair vs. Other-Language Repair: Telling the Medium of a Bilingual Conversation.” International Journal of Bilingualism 4 (3): 327–350. Crossref.Google Scholar
2001 “Linguistic Identities in Talk-in-interaction: Order in Bilingual Conversation.” Journal of Pragmatics 33: 1901–1925.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005 “Demythologising Language Alternation Studies: Conversational Structure vs. Social Structure in Bilingual Interaction.” Journal of Pragmatics 37 (3): 281–300.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gafaranga, J.
2007a “Code-switching as a Conversational Strategy.” In Handbook of Multilingualism and Multilingual Communication, ed. by Peter Auer and Li Wei, 279–313. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Gafaranga, Joseph
2007bTalk in Two Languages. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2009 “The Conversation Analytic Model of Code-switching.” In Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching, ed. by Barbara E. Bullock and Almeida J. Toribio, 114–126. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
2010 “Medium Request: Talking Language Shift into Being.” Language in Society 39: 241–270.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012 “Language Alternation and Conversational Repair in Bilingual Conversation.” International Journal of Bilingualism 16: 501–527.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2017Bilingualism as Interactional Practices. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gafaranga, Joseph, and Maria-Carme Torras
2001 “Language Versus Medium in the Study of Bilingual Conversation.” International Journal of Bilingualism 5: 195–219.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2002 “Interactional Otherness: Towards a Redefinition of Codeswitching.” International Journal of Bilingualism 6 (1): 1–22. Crossref.Google Scholar
Gajo, Laurent and Gabriela, Steffen
2015 “Didactique du Plurilinguisme et Alternance de Codes: Le Cas de l’Enseignement Bilingue Précoce.” The Canadian Modern Language Review / La Revue Canadienne des Langues Vivantes 71 (4): 471–499.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ganuza, Natalia, and Christina Hedman
2015 “Struggles for Legitimacy in Mother Tongue Instruction in Sweden.” Language and Education 29 (2): 125–139. Crossref.Google Scholar
2017a “Ideology vs. Practice: Is There a Space for Translanguaging in Mother Tongue Instruction?” In New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education, ed. by Bethanne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglarka Straszer and Asa Wedin, 208–226. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
2017b “The Impact of Mother Tongue Instruction on the Development of Biliteracy: Evidence from Somali–Swedish Bilinguals.” Applied Linguistics. Advance online publication. Crossref.Google Scholar
García, Ofelia and Tatyana Kleyn
(eds) 2016Translanguaging with Multilingual Students: Learning from Classroom Moments. New York, NY: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gardner, Rod
2001When Listeners Talk: Response Tokens and Listener Stance. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2004 “On Delaying the Answer: Question Sequences Extended After the Question.” In Second Language Conversations, ed. by Rod Gardner and Johannes Wagner, 246–266. New York/London: Continuum Press.Google Scholar
2008 “Conversation Analysis and Orientation to Learning.” Journal of Applied Linguistics 5 (3): 229–244.Google Scholar
2013 “Conversation Analysis in the Classroom.” In Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 593–611. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Harold
1967Studies in Ethnomethodology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
1991 “Respecification: Evidence for Locally Produced, Naturally Accountable Phenomena of Order, Logic, Reason, Meaning, Method, etc. in and as of the Essential Haecceity of Immortal Ordinary Society, (I) – An Announcement of Studies.” In Ethnomethodology and Human Sciences, ed. by Graham Button, 10–19. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gass, Susan M., Alison Mackey, and Teresa Pica
1998 “The Role of Input and Interaction in Second Language Acquisition. Introduction to the Special Issue.” The Modern Language Journal 82 (3): 299–307. Crossref.Google Scholar
Gierlinger, Erwin
2015 ““You Can Speak German, Sir”: On the Complexity of Teachers’ L1 Use in CLIL.” Language and Education 29 (4): 347–368.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Goffman, Erving
1967Interaction Ritual: Essays on Face-to-Face Behaviour. New York, NY: Doubleday.Google Scholar
1981Forms of Talk. Pennsylvania, PA: Pennsylvania University Press.Google Scholar
1999 “On Face-work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction.” In The Discourse Reader, ed. by Adam Jaworski and Nikolas Couplan, 306–320. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Goodwin, Charles
2000 “Action and Embodiment Within Situated Human Interaction.” Journal of Pragmatics 32 (10): 1489–1522.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007a “Environmentally Coupled Gestures.” In Gesture and the Dynamic Dimension of Language, ed. by Susan, D. Duncan, Justine Cassell and Elena T. Levy, 195–212. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007b “Participation, Stance and Affect in the Organization of Activities.” Discourse and Society 18 (1): 53–73.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2009 “Embodied Hearers and Speakers Constructing Talk and Action in Interaction.” Cognitive Studies 16 (1): 51–64.Google Scholar
2013 “The Co-operative, Transformative Organization of Human Action and Knowledge.” Journal of Pragmatics 46: 8–23.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Goodwin, Marjorie H.
1990He-said-she-said: Talk as Social Organization Among Black Children. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Goodwin, Marjorie H., and Charles Goodwin
1986 “Gesture and Co-participation in the Activity of Searching for a Word.” Semiotica 62: 51–75. Crossref.Google Scholar
Gravano, Augustin, Stefan Benus, Julia Hirschberg, Shira Mitchell, and Ilia Vovsha
2007 “Classification of Discourse Functions of Affirmative Words in Spoken Dialogue.” In Proceedings of Interspeech, 1613–1616. Antwerp, Belgium August 2007.Google Scholar
Greer, Tim
2013 “Word Search Sequences in Bilingual Interaction: Codeswitching and Embodied Orientation Toward Shifting Participant Constellations.” Journal of Pragmatics 57: 100–117.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Greggio, Saionara, and Gloria Gil
2007 “Teacher’s and Learners’ Use of Code Switching in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom: A Qualitative Study.” Linguagem and Ensino 10 (2): 371–393.Google Scholar
Gumperz, John J.
1982Discourse Strategies. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gumperz, John J., and Jenny Cook-Gumperz
2005 “Making Space for Bilingual Communicative Practice.” Intercultural Pragmatics 2 (1): 1–23.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Haddington, Pentti, Lorenza Mondada, and Maurice Nevile
(eds) 2013Interaction and Mobility: Language and the Body in Motion. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hall, Graham, and Guy Cook
2012 “Own-Language Use in Language Teaching and Learning.” Language Teaching 45 (3): 271–308. Crossref.Google Scholar
Harré, Rom and Luk Van Langenhove
1991 “Varieties of Positioning.” Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 21 (4): 393–407.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hatch, Evelyn and Cheryl Brown
1995Vocabulary, Semantics and Language Education. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hayano, Kaoru
2011 “Claiming Epistemic Primacy: Yo-marked Assessments in Japanese.” In The Morality of Knowledge in Conversation, ed. by Tanya Stivers, Lorenza Mondada and Jakob Steensig, 58–81. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2013 “Question Design in Conversation.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 395–414. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Hayashi, Makoto
2013 “Turn Allocation and Turn Sharing.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 167–190. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
He, Agnes W.
2013 “The Wor(l)d is a Collage: Multi-performance by Chinese Heritage Language Speakers.” The Modern Language Journal 97 (2): 304–317.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Heap, James
1982 “Understanding Classroom Events: A Critique of Durkin with an Alternative.” Journal of Reading Behavior 14 (4): 391–410.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Heath, Christian, and Paul Luff
2000Technology in Action. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Heinemann, Trine, Anna Lindström, and Jakob Steensig
2011 “Addressing Epistemic Incongruence in Question-answer Sequences Through the Use of Epistemic Adverbs.” In The Morality of Knowledge in Conversation, ed. by Tanya Stivers, Lorenza Mondada and Jakob Steensig, 107–130. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Heller, Monica
1995 “Code-switching and the Politics of Language.” In One Speaker, Two Languages: Cross-disciplinary Perspectives on Code-switching, ed. by Lesley Milroy and Pieter Muysken, 158–174. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hellermann, John
2003 “The Interactive Work of Prosody in the IRF Exchange: Teacher Repetition in Feedback Moves.” Language in Society 32 (1): 79–104. Crossref.Google Scholar
2008Social Actions for Classroom Language Learning. Clevedon; Buffalo: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Hellermann, John, and Yo-An Lee
2014 “Members and Their Competencies: Contributions of Ethnomethodological Conversation Analysis to a Multilingual Turn in Second Language Acquisition.” System 44: 54–65.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hellermann, John, and Simona Pekarek Doehler
2010 “On the Contingent Nature of Language Learning Tasks.” Classroom Discourse 1: 25–45. Crossref.Google Scholar
Henrichsen, Lynn E.
1989Diffusion of Innovations in English Language Teaching: The ELEC Effort in Japan, 1956–1968. New York, NY: Greenwood Press.Google Scholar
Hepburn, Alexa, and Gallina Bolden
2013 “The Conversation Analytic Approach to Transcription.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 57–76. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Hepburn, Alexa, Sue Wilkinson, and Carly W. Butler
2014 “Intervening with Conversation Analysis in Telephone Helpline Services: Strategies to Improve Effectiveness.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 47 (3): 201–218.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, John
1984a “A Change-of-state Token and Aspects of its Sequential Placement.” In Structures of Social Action, ed. by J. Maxwell Atkinson and John Heritage, 299–347. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
1984bGarfinkel and Ethnomethodology. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.Google Scholar
1987 “Ethnomethodology.” In Social Theory Today, ed. by Anthony Giddens and Jonathon H. Turner, 224–272. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
1989 “Current Developments in Conversation Analysis.” In Conversation: An Interdisciplinary Perspective, ed. by Derek, Roger and Peter, Bull, 21–47. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
1997 “Conversation Analysis and Institutional Talk: Analysing Data.” In Qualitative Research, ed. by David, Silverman, 161–182. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
1998 “ Oh-prefaced Responses to Inquiry.” Language in Society 27: 291–334.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2002 “Oh-prefaced Responses to Assessment: A Method of Modifying Agreement/disagreement.” In The Language of Turn and Sequence, ed. by Cecilia E. Ford, Barbara E. Fox and Sandra A. Thompson, 196–224. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
2005 “Cognition in Discourse.” In Conversation and Cognition, ed. by Hedwig te Molder and Jonathon Potter, 184–202. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012a “The Epistemic Engine: Sequence Organisation and Territories of Knowledge.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 45 (1): 30–52. Crossref.Google Scholar
2012b “Epistemics in Action: Action Formation and Territories of Knowledge.” Research on Language Research on Language and Social Interaction 45 (1): 1–29.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2013 “Epistemics in Conversation.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 370–394. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
2018 “The Ubiquity of Epistemics: A Rebuttal to the ‘Epistemics of Epistemics’ Group.” Discourse Studies 20 (1): 14–56. Crossref.Google Scholar
Heritage, John, and Geoffrey Raymond
2005 “The Terms of Agreement: Indexing Epistemic Authority and Subordination in Talk-in-interaction.” Social Psychology Quarterly 68 (1): 15–38.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012 “Navigating Epistemic Landscapes: Acquiescence, Agency and Resistance in Responses to Polar Questions.” In Questions: Formal, Functional and Interactional Perspectives, ed. by Jan-Peter de Ruiter, 179–192. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, John and Jeffrey D. Robinson
2011 “ ‘Some’ Versus ‘Any’ Medical Issues: Encouraging Patients to Reveal Their Unmet Concerns.” In Applied Conversation Analysis: Intervention and Change in Institutional Talk, ed. by Charles Antaki, 15–31. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, John, and Maria-Leena Sorjonen
1994 “Constituting and Maintaining Activities Across Sequences: And-prefacing as a Feature of Question Design.” Language in Society 23: 1–29.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hoang, Thi Giang Lam and Anna Filipi
2016 “In Pursuit of Understanding and Response: A Micro-analysis of Language Alternation Practices in an EFL University Context in Vietnam.” The Language Learning Journal. Crossref.Google Scholar
Hoang, Van Van
2013 “The Role of English in the Internationalization of Higher Education in Vietnam”. VNU Journal of Foreign Studies 29 (1): 72–80.Google Scholar
Hosoda, Yuri
2006 “Repair and Relevance of Differential Language Expertise in Second Language Conversations.” Applied Linguistics 27 (1): 25–50.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hosoda, Yuri, and David Aline
2013 “Two Preferences in Question-answer Sequences in Language Classroom Context.” Classroom Discourse 4 (1): 63–88.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Huq, Rizwan-ul, Katarina Eriksson Barajas, and Jakob Cromdal
2017 “Sparkling, Wrinkling, Softly Tinkling: On Poetry and Word Meaning in a Bilingual Primary Classroom.” In Children’s Knowledge-in-interaction: Studies in Conversation Analysis, ed. by Amanda Bateman and Amelia Church, 189–209. Berlin: Springer.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hutchby, Ian and Robin, Wooffitt
2008Conversation Analysis, 2nd edition. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.Google Scholar
Huth, Thorsten, and Carmen Taleghani-Nikazm
2006 “How Can Insights from Conversation Analysis Be Directly Applied to Teaching L2 Pragmatics?Language Teaching Research 10 (1): 53–79.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hyland, Ken and Lillian C. Wong
2013Innovation and Change in English Language Education. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
Hyltenstam, Kenneth, and Tommaso Milani
2012 “Flerspråkighetens Sociopolitiska och Sociokulturella Ramar” [Multilingualism’s Sociopolitical and Sociocultural Framework]. In Flerspråkighet: en Forskningsöversikt [Multilingualism: A Research Overview] Volume 5, ed. by Kenneth Hyltenstam, Monica Axelsson and Inger Lindberg, 17–152. Stockholm: Swedish Research Council.Google Scholar
Hyltenstam, Kenneth, and Veli Tuomela
1996 “Hemspråksundervisningen [Home Language Instruction].” In Tvåspråkighet MedFörhinder [Bilingualism with Obstacles], ed. by Kenneth Hyltenstam, 9–109. Lund, Sweden: Studentlitteratur.Google Scholar
Ihemere, Kelechukwu U.
2007A Tri-generational Study of Language Choice and Language Shift in Port Harcourt. Boca Raton, Florida: Universal Publishers.Google Scholar
Jacoby, Sally
1998 “How Can ESP Practitioners Tap into Situated Discourse Research. And Why Should We? (Part 1 & 2).” English for Specific Purposes News 7 (1–2): 1–10.Google Scholar
Jakonen, Teppo
2016 “Managing Multiple Normativities in Classroom Interaction: Student Responses to Teacher Reproaches for Inappropriate Language Choice in a Bilingual Classroom.” Linguistics and Education 33: 14–27.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Jefferson, Gail
1972 “Side sequences.” In Studies in Social Interaction, ed. by David N. Sudnow, 294–33. New York, NY: Free Press.Google Scholar
1984 “Notes on a Systematic Deployment of the Acknowledgement Tokens “Yeah”; and “Mm Hm”.” Papers in Linguistics 17 (2): 197–216.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1989 “Preliminary Notes on a Possible Metric which Provides for a ‘Standard Maximum’ Silence of Approximately One Second in Conversation.” In Conversation: An Interdisciplinary Perspective, ed. by Derek Roger and Peter Bull, 166–196. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
2004 “Glossary of Transcript Symbols with an Introduction.” In Conversation Analysis: Studies from the First Generation, ed. by Gene H. Lerner, 13–31. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Jørgensen, Jens N.
2003 “Languaging Among Fifth Graders: Code-switching in Conversation 501 of the Køge Project”. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 24: 126–148.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Jørgensen, Jens N., and Anne Holmen
(eds) 1997The Development of Successive Bilingualism in School-Age Children. Copenhagen Studies in Bilingualism 27. Copenhagen: Royal Danish School of Educational Studies.Google Scholar
Kääntä, Leila
. Forthcoming. “A Multimodal Perspective into Teachers’ Definitional Practices: Comparing Subject-specific Language in Physics and History Lessons. In Classroom-based Conversation Analytic Research: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives on Pedagogy ed. by Silvia Kunitz, Olcay Sert and Numa Markee. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing AG.
Kääntä, Leila, Gabriele Kasper, and Arja Piirainen-Marsh
2016 “Explaining Hooke’s Law: Definitional Practices in a CLIL Physics Classroom.” Applied Linguistics. Advance online publication. Crossref.Google Scholar
Kasper, Gabriele
2004 “Participant Orientations in German Conversation-for-Learning.” The Modern Language Journal 88 (4): 551–567. Crossref.Google Scholar
2009 “Locating Cognition in Second Language Interaction and Learning: Inside the Skull or in Public View?International Review of Applied Linguistics 47: 11–36.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kasper, Gabriele, and Younhee Kim
2015 “Conversation-for-learning: Institutional Talk Beyond the Classroom.” In The Handbook of Classroom Discourse and Interaction, ed. by Numa Markee, 390–408. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Kasper, Gabriele, and Johannes Wagner
2011 “A Conversation-analytic Approach to Second Language Acquisition.” In Alternative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition, ed. by Dwight Atkinson, 117–142. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Kemmis, Stephen, and Robin McTaggart
2005 “Participatory Action Research: Communicative Action and the Public Sphere. ” In The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research, ed. by Norman K. Denzin, and Yvonna S. Lincoln, 559–603. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Kennedy, Chris
1988 “Evaluation of the Management of Change in ELT Projects.” Applied Linguistics 9: 329–342.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1999Innovation and Best Practice. Harlow, UK: Longman.Google Scholar
Kennedy, Chris, Paul Doyle and Christine Goh
(eds) 1999Exploring Change in English Language Teaching. Oxford, UK: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Kheirkhah, Mina
2016 “From Family Language Practices to Family Language Policies: Children as Socializing Agents.” Doctoral thesis, Linköping University, Sweden.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kheirkhah, Mina, and Asta Cekaite
2015 “Language Maintenance in a Multilingual Family: Informal Heritage Language Lessons in Parent-Child Interactions.” Multilingua 34 (3): 319–346. Crossref.Google Scholar
Kieu, Kim Anh Hang
2010 “Use of Vietnamese in English Language Teaching in Vietnam: Attitudes of Vietnamese University Teachers.” English Language Teaching 3 (2): 119–128. Crossref.Google Scholar
Kim, Sun Hee Ok and Catherine Elder
2005 “Language Choices and Pedagogic Functions in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Cross-linguistic Functional Analysis of Teacher Talk.” Language Teaching Research 9 (4): 355–380. Crossref.Google Scholar
Kitzinger, Celia
2013 “Repair.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 229–256. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Ko, Sungbae
2014 “The Nature of Multiple Responses to Teachers’ Questions.” Applied Linguistics 35 (1): 48–62.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kontio, Janne, and Kerstin L. Sylvén
2015 “Language Alternation and Language Norm in Vocational Content and Language Integrated Learning.” The Language Learning Journal 43 (3): 271–285.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Koshik, Irene
2002 “Designedly Incomplete Utterances: A Pedagogical Practice for Eliciting Knowledge Displays in Error Correction Sequences.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 35: 277–309.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Koshik, Irene A., and Mi-Suk Seo
2012 “Word (and Other) Search Sequences Initiated by Language Learners.” Text and Talk 32 (2): 167–189.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kramsch, Claire
2009The Multilingual Subject: What Foreign Language Learners Say about their Experience and Why It Matters. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Kunitz, Sylvia
2013 “Group Planning Among L2 Learners of Italian: A Conversation Analytic Perspective.” Doctoral thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.Google Scholar
Kunitz, Silvia
2015 “Scriptlines as Emergent Artifacts in Collaborative Group Planning”. Journal of Pragmatics 76: 135–149. Crossref.Google Scholar
Kunitz, Silvia, and Numa Markee
2017 “Understanding the Fuzzy Borders of Context in Conversation Analysis and Ethnography”. In Discourse and Education, ed. by Stanton Wortham, Deoksoon and Stephen May, 15–27. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. Crossref.Google Scholar
Kyratzis, Amy, Ya-Ting Tang, and Bahar S. Koymen
2009 “Codes, Code-switching, and Context: Style and Footing in Peer Group Bilingual Play.” Multilingua–Journal of Crosscultural and Interlanguage Communication 28: 265–290. Crossref.Google Scholar
Lamerich, Joyce and Hedwig te Molder
2011 “Reflecting on Your Talk: The Discursive Action Method at Work.” In Applied Conversation Analysis: Intervention and Change in Institutional Talk, ed. by Charles Antaki, 184–206. UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lantolf, James P.
2012 “Sociocultural Theory: A Dialectical Approach to L2 Research.” In The Routledge Handbook of Second Language Acquisition, ed. by Susan M. Gass and Alison Mackey, 57–72. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Lasagabaster, David
2013 “The Use of the L1 in CLIL Classes: The Teachers’ Perspective.” Latin American Journal of Content and Language Integrated Learning 6 (2): 1–21. Crossref eISSN 2322–9721.Google Scholar
Lazaraton, Anne
1991 “A Conversation Analysis of Structure and Interaction in the Language Interview.” Doctoral thesis, University of California, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
2002A Qualitative Approach to the Validation of Oral Language Tests. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
2004 “Gesture and Speech in the Vocabulary Explanations of One ESL Teacher: A Microanalytic Inquiry.” Language Learning 54 (1): 79–117. Crossref.Google Scholar
Le, Van Canh
2004 “From Ideology to Inquiry: Mediating Asian and Western Values in ELT.” The Journal of Asia TEFL 1 (1): 167–183.Google Scholar
2014 “Codeswitching in Universities in Vietnam and Indonesia.” In Codeswitching in University English-medium Classes, ed. by Roger Barnard and James McLellan, 118–144. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Le, Van Canh, and Roger Barnard
2009 “Curricular Innovation Behind Closed Classroom Doors: A Vietnamese Case Study.” Teacher’s Edition (Vietnam) 24 (2): 20–33.Google Scholar
Lee, Jin Sook, and Mary Bucholtz, M.
2015 “Language socialization across learning spaces.” In The Handbook of Classroom Discourse and Interaction, ed. by Numa, Markee, 319–336. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Lee, Yo An
2007 “Third Turn Position in Teacher Talk: Contingency and the Work of Teaching.” Journal of Pragmatics 39: 1204–1230. Crossref.Google Scholar
Lee, Yo-An
(2010) “Learning in the contingency of talk-in-interaction”. Text & Talk 30 (4): 403–422.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lehti-Eklund, Hanna
2012 “Code-switching to First Language in Repair: A Resource for Students’ Problem Solving in a Foreign Language Classroom.” International Journal of Bilingualism 17: 132–152.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lerner, Gene H.
1991 “On the Syntax of Sentences in Progress.” Language in Society 20: 441–458.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1992 “Assisted Story Telling: Deploying Shared Knowledge as a Practical Matter.” Qualitative Sociology 15: 247–271.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1995 “Turn Design and the Organization of Participation in Instructional Activities.” Discourse Processes 19 (1): 111–131.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1996 “On the “Semi-permeable” Character of Grammatical Units in Conversation: Conditional Entry Into the Turn Space of Another Speaker.” In Interaction and Grammar, ed. by Elinor Ochs, Emanuel A. Schegloff and Sandra A. Thomson, 238–276. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Levine, Glenn S.
2003 “Student and Instructor Beliefs and Attitudes About Target Language Use, First Language Use and Anxiety: Report of a Questionnaire Study.” The Modern Language Journal 87 (3): 343–364.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011Code Choice in the Language Classroom. Bristol, Buffalo, Toronto: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Lewis, Gwyn, Bryn Jones, and Colin Baker
2012 “Translanguaging: Developing its Conceptualisation and Contextualisation.” Educational Research and Evaluation 18 (7): 655–670. Crossref.Google Scholar
Liberg, Caroline
1990 “Learning to Read and Write.” Doctoral thesis, Uppsala University, Sweden.Google Scholar
Liddicoat, Anthony
2007An Introduction to Conversation Analysis. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Liebscher, Grit, and Jennifer Dailey-O’Cain
2005 “Learner Code-Switching in the Content-Based Foreign Language Classroom.” The Modern Language Journal 89 (2): 234–247. Crossref.Google Scholar
Lin, Angel M. Y.
1990Teaching in Two Tongues: Language Alternation in Foreign Language Classrooms. Research Report No. 3. Hong Kong City Polytechnic. Dept. of English.Google Scholar
1999 “Doing-English-Lessons in the Reproduction or Transformation of Social Worlds?TESOL Quarterly 33 (3): 393–412.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2008 “Code-switching in the Classroom: Research Paradigms and Approaches.” In Encyclopedia of Language and Education, 2nd Edition, Volume 10: Research Methods in Language and Education, ed. by Kendall A. King and Nancy H. Hornberger, 273–286. New York, NY: Springer Science.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2013 “Classroom Code-switching: Three Decades of Research.” Applied Linguistics Review 4 (1): 195–218. Crossref.Google Scholar
2015 “Conceptualising the potential role of L1 in CLIL.” Language, Culture and Curriculum 28 (1): 74–89.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lin, Angel M. Y., and Yuen Y. Lo
2016 “Trans/languaging and the Triadic Dialogue in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) Classrooms.” Language and Education 31 (1): 26–45. Crossref.Google Scholar
Lindström, Anna
2017 ”Calibrating an Agnostic Epistemic Stance in Swedish Conversation: The Case of Okej-prefacing in Calls to the Swedish Board for Study Support.” In At the Intersection of Turn and Sequence: Turn-initial Particles Across Languages, ed. by John Heritage and Marja-Leena Sorjonen, 333–364. Berlin: John Benjamins Publishing Company.Google Scholar
Linell, Per
1998Approaching Dialogue. Talk, Interaction and Contexts in Dialogical Perspectives. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005The Written Language Bias in Linguistics: Its Nature, Origins and Transformations. London/New York: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2009Rethinking Language, Mind, and World Dialogically: Interactional and Contextual Theories of Human Sense-Making. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.Google Scholar
Littlewood, William, and Baohua Yu
2011 “First Language and Target Language in the Foreign Language Classroom.” Language Teaching 44 (1): 64–77. Crossref.Google Scholar
Long, Michael H.
1996 “The Role of the Linguistic Environment in Second Language Acquisition.” In The Handbook of Second Language Acquisition, ed. by William Ritchie and Tej K. Bhatia, 413–468. New York, NY: Academic Press. Reprinted in Ortega Lourdes (ed) 2011 Second Language Acquisition: Critical Concepts in Linguistics. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Loughran, John
2010What Expert Teachers Do: Enhancing Professional Knowledge for Classroom Practice. Sydney, Australia: Allen and Unwin.Google Scholar
Lüdi, George
2003 “Code-switching and Unbalanced “Bilingualism”. In Bilingualism: Beyond Basic Principles, ed. by Jean-Marc Dewaele, Alex Housen and Li Wei, 174–188. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Macaro, Ernesto
2005 “Codeswitching in the L2 Classroom: A Communication and Learning Strategy.” In Non-native Language Teachers: Perceptions, Challenges and Contributions to the Profession ed. by Enric Llurda, 63–84. Boston, MA: Springer Science and Business Media.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2009 “Teacher Use of Codeswitching in the Second Language Classroom: Exploring ‘Optimal’ Use.” In First Language Use in Second and Foreign Language Learning, ed. by Miles Turnbull and Jennifer Dailey-O’Cain, 35–49. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Mackey, William F.
2000 [1962] “The Description of Bilingualism.” In The Bilingualism Reader, ed. by Li Wei, 26–54. London: Routledge (Reprinted from Canadian Journal of Linguistics 7: 51–85 1962).Google Scholar
Mafela, Lily
2009 “Code-switching in Botswana History Classrooms in the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development.” Language Matters 40 (1): 56–79. Crossref.Google Scholar
Malmkjaer, Kirsten
1997 “Translation and Language Teaching.” AILA Review 12: 56–61.Google Scholar
Markee, Numa
1992 “The Diffusion of Innovation in Language Teaching.” Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 13: 229–243.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1994 “Toward an Etnomethodological Respecification of Second-Language Acquisition Studies.” In Research Methodology in Second-language Acquisition ed. by Elaine E. Tarone, Susan M. Gass and Andrew D. Cohen, 89–116. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
1995 “Teachers’ Answers to Students’ Questions: Problematizing the Issue of Making Meaning.” Issues in Applied Linguistics 6: 63–92.Google Scholar
1997aManaging Curricular Innovation. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
1997b “Second Language Acquisition Research: A Resource for Changing Teachers’ Professional Cultures?The Modern Language Journal 81: 80–93.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2000Conversation Analysis. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
2002 “Language in Development: Questions of Theory, Questions of Practice.” TESOL Quarterly 36 (3): 265–274.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2004 “Zones of Interactional Transition in ESL Classes.” The Modern Language Journal 88: 583–596.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005 “A Conversation Analytic Perspective on Off-task Classroom Talk: Implications for Second Language Acquisition Studies.” In Applying Conversation Analysis, ed. by Keith Richards and Paul Seedhouse, 187–213. London: Palgrave-MacMillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2008 “Toward a Learning Behavior Tracking Methodology for CA-for-SLA.” Applied Linguistics 29: 404–427.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011 “Doing, and Justifying Doing, Avoidance.” Journal of Pragmatics 43: 602–615.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2013 “Contexts of Change.” In Innovation in English Language Education, ed. by Ken Hyland and Lillian Wong, 28–43. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
Markee, N.
2015 “Giving and Following Pedagogical Instructions in Task-based Instruction: An Ethnomethodological Perspective.” In International Perspectives on ELT Classroom Interaction, ed. by Christopher Jenks and Paul Seedhouse, 110–128. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Markee, Numa, and Gabriele Kasper
2004 “Classroom Talks: An Introduction.” The Modern Language Journal 88: 491–497. Crossref.Google Scholar
Markee, Numa, and Silvia Kunitz
2013 “Doing Planning and Task Performance in Second Language Acquisition: An Ethnomethodological Respecification.” Language Learning 63 (4): 629–664.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Markee, Numa and Silvia Kunitz
2015 “CA-for-SLA Studies of Classroom Interaction: Quo Vadis?” In The Handbook of Classroom Discourse and Interaction, ed. by Numa Markee, 425–439. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Martin, Peter W.
1996 “Code-switching in the Primary Classroom: One Response to the Planned and Unplanned Language Environment in Brunei.” Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 17 (2–4): 128–144. Crossref.Google Scholar
Martin, Peter W., Arvind Bhatt, Nirvala Bhojani, and Angela Creese
2006 “Managing Bilingual Interaction in a Gujarati Complementary School in Leicester.” Language and Education 20 (1): 5–22. Crossref.Google Scholar
May, Stephen
(ed) 2014The Multilingual Turn: Implications for SLA, TESOL, and Bilingual Education. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
McHoul, Alec. W.
1990 “The Organization of Repair in Classroom Talk.” Language in Society 19 (3): 349–377. Crossref.Google Scholar
Mehan, Hugh
1979Learning Lessons: Social Organization in the Classroom. Boston, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Milk, Robert D.
1982 “Language Use in Bilingual Classrooms: Two Case Studies.” In On TESOL ’81. Selected Papers from the Annual Conference of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, ed. by Mary Hines and William Rutherford, 181–191. Washington, DC: TESOL.Google Scholar
Milroy, Lesley, and Li Wei
1995 “A Social Network Approach to Code-switching: The Example of a Bilingual Community in Britain.” In One Speaker, Two Languages: Cross-disciplinary Perspectives on Code-switching, ed. by Lesley Milroy and Pieter Muysken, 136–157. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mondada, Lorenza
2014 “The Conversation Analytic Approach to Data Collection.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 32–56. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Mondada, Lorenza, and Simona Pekarek Doehler
2004 “Second Language Acquisition as Situated Practice: Task Accomplishment in the French Second Language Classroom.” The Modern Language Journal 88 (4): 501–518. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Moore, Danièle
2002 “Case Study: Code-switching and Learning in the Classroom.” International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 5 (5): 279–293.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Moore, Emilee
2014Constructing Content and Language Knowledge in Plurilingual Student Teamwork: Situated and Longitudinal Perspectives.” International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 17 (5): 586–609.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Moore, Paul J.
2013 “An Emergent Perspective on the Use of the First Language in the English-as-a-Foreign-Language Classroom.” The Modern Language Journal 97: 239–253. Crossref.Google Scholar
Mori, Junko
2004 “Negotiating Sequential Boundaries and Learning Opportunities: A Case from a Japanese Language Classroom.” The Modern Language Journal 88: 536–550. Crossref.Google Scholar
Mori, Junko, and Atsushi Hasegawa
2009 “Doing Being a Foreign Language Learner in a Classroom: Embodiment of Cognitive States as Social Events.” International Review of Applied Linguistics 47 (1): 65–94. Crossref.Google Scholar
Mortensen, Kristian
2011 “Doing Word Explanation in Interaction.” In L2 Learning as Social Practice: Conversation-analytic Perspectives, ed. by Gabriele Pallotti and Johannes, Wagner, 135–163. Honolulu: National Foreign Language Resource Center, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.Google Scholar
Mortensen, Kristian, and Spencer Hazel
2011 “Initiating Round Robins in the L2 Classroom – Preliminary Observations. Novitas-ROYAL (Research on Youth and Language) 5 (1): 55–70.Google Scholar
Morton, Thomas
2015 “Vocabulary Explanations in CLIL Classrooms: A Conversation Analysis Perspective.” The Language Learning Journal 43 (3): 256–270. Crossref.Google Scholar
Murphy, Keith
2005 “Collaborative Imagining: The Interactive Use of Gestures, Talk, and Graphic Representation in Architectural Practice.” Semiotica 156: 113–145.Google Scholar
Musk, Nigel
2006 “Performing Bilingualism in Wales with the Spotlight on Welsh: A Study of the Language Practices of Young People in Bilingual Education.” Doctoral thesis, Linköping University, Sweden.Google Scholar
2010a “Identitet Som Dynamisk Process. Exemplet Tvåspråkiga Ungdomar i Wales [Identity as a Dynamic Process. The Case of Bilingual Young People in Wales].” In Flerspråkighet, Identitet och Lärande [Multilingualism, Identity and Learning], ed. by Nigel Musk and Åsa Wedin, 55–77. Lund, Sweden: Studentlitteratur.Google Scholar
2010b “Code-switching and Code-mixing in Welsh Bilinguals’ Talk: Confirming or Refuting the Maintenance of Language Boundaries?Language, Culture and Curriculum 23 (3): 179–197.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Muysken, Pieter
1995 “Code-switching and Grammatical Theory.” In One Speaker Two languages: Cross-disciplinary Perspectives on Code-switching, ed. by Lesley Milroy and Pieter Muysken, 177–198. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Myers-Scotton, Carol
1993Social Motivations for Codeswitching: Evidence from Africa. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Nation, Paul
2008Teaching Vocabulary: Strategies and Techniques. Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning.Google Scholar
2013Learning Vocabulary in Another Language, 2nd edition. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nguyen, Minh Hue
2013 “The Curriculum for English Language Teacher Education in Australian and Vietnamese Universities.” Australian Journal of Teacher Education 38 (11): 33–53. Crossref.Google Scholar
Nguyen, Quang Tien
2012 “English-Vietnamese Code-switching in Tertiary Educational Context in Vietnam.” Asian Englishes 15 (2): 4–29. Crossref.Google Scholar
Nguyen, Thị Hằng
2013 “Vietnamese University EFL Teachers’ Code-switching in Classroom Instruction.” Doctoral thesis, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.Google Scholar
Nguyen, Thi Mai Hoa
(2011) “Primary English language education policy in Vietnam: Insights from implementation.” Current Issues in Language Planning 12 (2): 225–24.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nguyen, Thi Nhu Quynh
2006 “Using Vietnamese: The Assistance or Interference in the Teaching-learning Process in English Language Classes.” University of Danang Journal of Science and Technology 22: 154–159.Google Scholar
Nikula, Tarja
2007 “The IRF Pattern and Space for Interaction: Comparing CLIL and EFL Classrooms.” In Empirical Perspectives on CLIL Classroom Discourse – CLIL: Empirische Untersuchungen Zum Unterrichtsdiskurs ed. by Christiane Dalton-Puffer and Uye Smit, 179–204. Frankfurt, Wien: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Nikula, Tarja, and Pat Moore
2016 “Exploring Translanguaging in CLIL.” International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. Crossref.Google Scholar
Nunan, David
1991Language Teaching Methodology: A Textbook for Teachers. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Ohta, Amy S.
2001Second Language Acquisition Processes in the Classroom. Mahwah, NJ.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Okada, Yusuke
2013 “Prioritization: A Formulation Practice and its Relevance for Interaction in Teaching and Testing Contexts.” In Pragmatics and Language Learning, Volume 13, ed. by Tim Greer, Donna Tatsuki and Carsten Roever, 55–77. Honolulu, HI: National Foreign Language Resource Center.Google Scholar
Okada, Yusuke, and Tim Greer
2013 “Pursuing a Relevant Response in OPI Roleplays.” In Assessing Second Language Pragmatics, ed. by Steven Ross and Gabriele Kasper, 288–310. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Osvaldsson, Karin, Daniel Persson-Thunqvist and Jakob Cromdal
2012 “Comprehension Checks, Clarifications, and Corrections in an Emergency Call With a Nonnative Speaker of Swedish.” The International Journal of Bilingualism 17 (2): 205–220.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pavlenko, Aneta
2005Emotions and Multilingualism. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Payne, George, and David Hustler
1980 “Teaching the Class: The Practical Management of a Cohort.” British Journal of Sociology of Education 1: 49–66.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pekarek Doehler, Simona, Esther González-Martínez, and Johannes Wagner
(eds) 2018Longitudinal Studies in Conversation Analysis. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Pekarek Doehler, Simona, and Virginie Fasel Lauzon
2015 “Documenting Change Across Time: Longitudinal and Cross-sectional CA Studies of Classroom Interaction.” In The Handbook of Classroom Discourse and Interaction, ed. by Numa Markee, 409–424. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Pham, Hoa Hiep
2001 “Teacher Development: A Real Need for English Department in Vietnam.” English Teaching Forum 39 (4): 36–40.Google Scholar
Philp, Jenefer, Rebecca Adams, and Noriko Iwashita
2014Peer Interaction and Second Language Learning. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Piirainen-Marsh, Arja
2010 “Bilingual practices and the social organisation of video gaming activities”. Journal of Pragmatics 42: 3012–3030.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Polio, Charlene P., and Patricia Duff
1994 “Teacher’s Language Use in Univeristy Foreign Language Classrooms: A Qualititative Analysis of English and Target Language Alternation.” The Modern Language Journal 78: 311–326.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pomerantz, Anita
1984 “Agreeing and Disagreeing with Assessment: Some Features of Preferred/dispreferred Turn Shapes.” In Structures of Social Action, ed. by J. Maxwell Atkinson and John Heritage, 57–101. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Pomerantz, Anita, and John Heritage
2014 “Preference.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 210–228. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Pomeroy, Lani, and Ann Weatherall
2014 “Responding to Client Laughter as Therapeutic Actions in Practice.” Qualitative Research in Psychology 11: 1–15.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Potowski, Kim J.
2004 “Student Spanish Use and Investment in a Dual Immersion Classroom: Implications for Second Language Acquisition and Heritage Language Maintenance.” The Modern Language Journal 88: 75–101.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Psathas, George
1995Conversation Analysis. London: Sage Publications.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Raymond, Geoffrey
2018 “Which Epistemics? Whose Conversation Analysis?Discourse Studies 20 (1): 57–89. Crossref.Google Scholar
Raymond, Geoffrey and John Heritage
2006 “The Epistemics of Social Relations: Owning Grandchildren.” Language in Society 35 (5): 677–705. Crossref.Google Scholar
Reath Warren, Anne
2017 “Developing Multilingual Literacies in Sweden and Australia: Opportunities and Challenges in Mother Tongue Instruction and Multilingual Study Guidance in Sweden and Community Language Education in Australia.” Doctoral thesis, Stockholm University, Sweden. http://​urn​.kb​.se​/resolve​?urn​=urn:nbn:se:su:diva​-144745.
Reichert, Tetyana
2010 “An Analysis of Peer Activities to Inform Foreign Language Learning: Word Searches, Voice, and the Use of Non-Target Languages. ” Doctoral thesis, University of Waterloo, Canada.Google Scholar
2016 “Researching Vocabulary Development: A Conversation Analytic Approach.” L2 Journal 8 (1): 1–17. http://​escholarship​.org​/uc​/item​/4xk6t6x6.
Reichert, Tetyana, and Grit Liebscher
2012 “Positioning the Expert: Word Searches, Expertise, and Learning Opportunities in Peer Interaction.” The Modern Language Journal 96 (4): 595–605.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Richards, Jack C.
1976 “The Role of Vocabulary Teaching.” TESOL Quarterly 10 (1): 77–89.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005Professional Development for Language Teachers: Strategies for Teacher Learning. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Richards, Jack C., and Theodore S. Rodgers
2001Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching, 2nd edition. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Richards, Keith
2005 “Introduction.” In Applying Conversation Analysis, ed. by Keith Richards and Paul Seedhouse, 1–18. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Richards, Keith, and Paul Seedhouse
(eds) 2005Applying Conversation Analysis. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Robinson, Jeffrey D.
2014 “Overall Structural Organization.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 257–280. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Robinson, Jeffrey D., and John Heritage
2014 “Intervening with Conversation Analysis: The Case of Medicine.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 47 (3): 201–218.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Rogers, Everett M.
2003Diffusions of Innovations, 5th edition. New York, NY: Free Press.Google Scholar
Romaine, Suzanne
1989Bilingualism. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Rowe, Mary Budd
1974 “Wait‐time and Rewards as Instructional Variables, Their Influence on Language, Logic, and Fate Control: Part One‐Wait‐Time.” Journal of Research in Science Teaching 11 (2): 81–94. Crossref.Google Scholar
1986 “Wait-time: Slowing Down May be a Way of Speeding Up!Journal of Teacher Education 37 (1): 43–50. Crossref.Google Scholar
Sacks, Harvey
1984 “Notes on Methodology.” In Structures of Social Action, ed. by J. Maxwell Atkinson and John Heritage, 21–27. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
1985 “ ‘On Doing “Being ordinary’.” In Structures of Social Action. Studies in Emotion and Social Interaction, ed. by J. Maxwell Atkinson, 413–429. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
1992 “April 12: Long Sequences.” In Lectures on Conversation Volume 2, ed. by Gail Jefferson, 354–359. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.Google Scholar
1995Lectures on Conversation, Volume 2. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sacks, Harvey, and Emanuel A. Schegloff
1979 “Two Preferences in the Organization of Reference to Persons in Conversation and Their Interaction.” In Everyday Language: Studies in Ethnomethodology, ed. by George Psathas, 15–21. New York, NY: Irvington.Google Scholar
Sacks, Harvey, Emanuel A. Schegloff, and Gail Jefferson
1974 “A Simplest Systematics for the Organization of Turn-taking for Conversation.” Language 50: 696–735.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1978 “A Simplest Systematics for the Organization of Turn Taking in Conversation.” In Studies in the Organization of Conversational Interaction, ed. by Jim Schenkein, 7–55. New York, NY: Academic Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sato, Masatoshi, and Susan Ballinger
(eds) 2016Peer Interaction and Second Language Learning: Pedagogical Potential and Research Agenda. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, Emanuel A.
1986 “The Routine as Achievement.” Human Studies 9: 111–151.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1987 “Between Micro and Macro: Context and Other Connections.” In The Micro-Macro Link, ed. by Jeffrey C. Alexander, Bernhard Giesen, Richard Munch and Neil J. Smelser, 207–234. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
1988 “Presequences and Indirection. Applying Speech Act Theory to Ordinary Conversation.” Journal of Pragmatics 12: 55–62.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1996a “Some Practices for Referring to Persons in Talk-in-interaction: A Partial Sketch of a Systematics.” In Studies in Anaphora Volume 33, ed. by Barbara A. Fox, 437–485. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1996b “Turn Organization: One Intersection of Grammar and Interaction.” In Interaction and Grammar, ed. by Elinor Ochs, Sandra Thompson and Emanuel A. Schegloff, 52–133. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007Sequence Organization in Interaction. A Primer in Conversation Analysis Volume 1. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2010 “Some Other U(h)ms .” Discourse Processes 47: 130–174.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011 “Word Repeats as Unit Ends.” Discourse Studies 13: 367–380.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, Emanuel A., Gail Jefferson, and Harvey Sacks
1977 “The Preference for Self-correction in the Organization of Repair in Conversation.” Language 53: 361–382.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Schenkein, Jim
1978 “A Sketch of an Analytic Mentality for the Study of Conversational Interaction.” In Studies in the Organization of Conversational Interaction, ed. by Jim Schenkein, 1–6. New York, NY: Academic Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Schmitt, Norbert
2000Vocabulary in Language Teaching. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Scott, Virginia M., and Maria J. De La Fuente
2008 “What’s the Problem? L2 Learners’ Use of the L1 During Consciousness-raising, Form-focused Tasks.” The Modern Language Journal 92: 100–113. Crossref.Google Scholar
Sebba, Mark, Mahootian Shahrzad, and Carla Jonsson
2012Language Mixing and Code-switching in Writing: Approaches to Mixed-language Written Discourse. London: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sebba, Mark, and Anthony Wootton
1998 “We, They and Identity: Sequential Versus Identity-related Explanation in Code-switching.” In Code-switching in Conversation, ed. by Peter Auer, 262–286. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Seedhouse, Paul
1995 “L2 Classroom Transcripts: Data in Search of a Methodology.” TESL EJ 1 (4): 1–16.Google Scholar
1997 “The Case of Missing “No”: The Relationship Between Pedagogy and Interaction.” Language Learning 47 (3): 547–583.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1999 “The Relationship Between Context and the Organization of Repair in the L2 Classroom.” International Review of Applied Linguistics 37 (1): 59–80.Google Scholar
2004The Interactional Architecture of the Language Classroom: A Conversation Analysis Perspective. Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
2005 “Conversation Analysis and Language Learning.” Language Teaching: The International Abstracting Journal for Language Teachers, Educators and Researchers 38 (4): 165–187.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2008 “Learning to talk the talk: Conversation analysis as a tool for induction of trainee teachers.” In Professional Encounters in TESOL, ed. by Sue Garton and Keith Richards, 42–57. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Seedhouse, Paul, and Maria Egbert
2006 “The Interactional Organisation of the IELTS Speaking Test.” IELTS Research Reports 6: 161–206. IELTS Canberra, Australia and British Council, London.Google Scholar
Seedhouse, Paul, and Andrew Harris
2011 “Topic Development in the IELTS Speaking Test. IELTS Research Reports 12: 55–110. IELTS Canberra, Australia and British Council, London.Google Scholar
Seedhouse, Paul and Sandra Morales
2017 “Candidates Questioning Examiners in the IELTS Speaking Test: An Intervention Study”. IELTS Research Reports Online Series, No. 5. British Council, Cambridge English Language Assessment and IDP: IELTS Australia. https://​www​.ielts​.org​/teaching​-and​-research​/research​-reports.
Seedhouse, Paul, Fumiyo, Nakatsuhara, Nick Saville, and Fiona Barker
2018The Discourse of the IELTS Speaking Test: Interactional Design and Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Selting, Margaret
1992 “Prosody in Conversational Questions.” Journal of Pragmatics 17: 315–345.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sert, Olcay
2005 “The Functions of Code-switching in ELT Classrooms.” The Internet TESL Journal 11 (8). http://​iteslj​.org​/Articles​/Sert​-CodeSwitching​.html.
2015Social Interaction and L2 Classroom Discourse. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Setati, Mamokgethi, Jill Adler, Yvonne Reed, and Abdool Bapoo
2002 “Incomplete Journeys: Code-switching and Other Language Practices in Mathematics, Science and English Language Classrooms in South Africa.” Language and Education 16 (2): 128–149.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Shaw, Rebecca, and Celia Kitzinger
2007 “Memory in Interaction: An Analysis of Repeat Calls to a Home Birth Helpline.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 40 (1): 117–144.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Shin, Sarah J., and Lesley Milroy
(2000) “Conversational Code-switching Among Korean-English Bilingual Children.” International Journal of Bilingualism 4: 351–384.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sidnell, Jack
2010Conversation Analysis. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
2013 “Basic Conversation Analytic Methods.” In The Handbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers, 77–99. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Sidnell, Jack, and Tanya Stivers
(eds) 2013The Handbook of Conversation Analysis. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.Google Scholar
Skolverket [Swedish National Agency for Education]
2009With Another Mother Tongue: Students in Compulsory School and the Organization of Teaching and Learning (321). http://​www​.skolverket​.se​/publikationer​?id​=2181.
Skolverket [Swedish National Agency for Education]
2011Curriculum for the Compulsory School, Preschool Class and the Recreation Centre 2011. Stockholm: Fritzes.Google Scholar
Skolverket [Swedish National Agency for Education]
2017Promemoria Students and Compulsory School Divisions for the 2016/17 School Year. https://​www​.skolverket​.se​/publikationer​?id​=3760.
Slotte-Lüttge, Anna
2007 “Making Use of Bilingualism–Construction of a Monolingual Classroom, and its Consequences.” International Journal of the Sociology of Language 187–188): 103–128. Crossref.Google Scholar
Sorjonen, Maria-Leena, and John Heritage
1991And-prefacing as a feature of question design. In Leikkauspiste, ed. by Lea Laitinen, Pirkko Nuolijärvi and Mirja Saari, 59–74. Helsinki, Finland: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura.Google Scholar
Spetz, Jenny
2014Debatterad och Marginaliserad: Perspektiv på Modersmålsundervisningen [Debated and Marginalized: Perspectives on Mother Tongue Instruction], Volume 6. Stockholm: The Language Council of Sweden.Google Scholar
St John, Oliver
2010 “Bilingual Lexical Interillumination in the Foreign Language Classroom.” Language, Culture and Curriculum 23 (3): 199–218. Crossref.Google Scholar
St John, Oliver, and Jakob Cromdal
2016 “Crafting Instructions Collaboratively: Student Questions and Dual Addressivity in Classroom Task Instructions.” Discourse Processes 53 (4): 252–279.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Steinbach-Kohler, Fee, and Steven L. Thorne
2011 “The Social Life of Self-directed Talk: A Sequential Phenomenon?” In L2 Interactional Competence and Development, ed. by Joan K. Hall, John Hellermann and Simona Pekarek Doehler, 66–92. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Stevanovic, Melissa, and Anssi Peräkylä
2012 “Deontic Authority in Interaction: The Right to Announce, Propose, and Decide.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 45 (3): 297–321.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Still, Arthur, and Costall, Alan
(eds.) 1991Against Cognitivism: Alternative Foundations for Cognitive Psychology. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf.Google Scholar
Stivers, Tanya, Nick. J. Enfield, Penelope Brown, Christina Englert, Makoto Hayashi, Trine Heinemann, Gertie Hoymann, Federico Rossano, Jan Peter de Ruiter, Kyung-Eun Yoon, and Stephen C. Levinson
2009 “Universals and Cultural Variation in Turn-taking in Conversation.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 106 (26): 10587–10592. Crossref.Google Scholar
Stivers, Tanya, Lorenza Mondada, and Jakob Steensig
2011 “Knowledge, Morality and Affiliation in Social Interaction.” In The Morality of Knowledge in Conversation, ed. by Tanya Stivers, Lorenza Mondada and Jakob Steensig, 3–26. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stivers, Tanya, and Jeffrey D. Robinson
2006 “A Preference for Progressivity in Interaction.” Language in Society 35 (3): 367–392.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stivers, Tanya, and Federico Rossano
2010 “Mobilizing Response.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 43: 3–31. Crossref.Google Scholar
Stokoe, Elizabeth
2011 “Stimulated Interaction and Communication Skills Training: The ‘Conversation-analytic Role-play Method’.” In Applied Conversation Analysis: Intervention and Change in Institutional Talk, ed. by Charles Antaki, 119–139. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2014 “The Conversation Analytic Role-play Method (CARM): A Method for Training Communication Skills as an Alternative to Simulated Role-play. Research on Language and Social Interaction 47 (3): 255–265. Crossref.Google Scholar
Storch, Neomy, and Gillian Wigglesworth
2003 “Is There a Role for the Use of the L1 in an L2 Setting?TESOL Quarterly 37 (4): 760–770.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Stroud, Christopher
1998 “Perspectives on Cultural Variability of Discourse and Some Implications for Code-switching.” In Code-Switching in Conversation. Language, Interaction and Identity, ed. by Peter Auer, 321–348. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Suchman, Lucy
2007Human-Machine Reconfigurations. Plans and Situated Actions. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Svennevig, Jan
2013 “Reformulation of Questions with Candidate Answers.” International Journal of Bilingualism 17 (2): 189–204.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Swain, Merrill, and Sharon Lapkin
2000 “Task-Based Second Language Learning: The Uses of the First Language.” Language Teaching Research 4 (3): 251–274.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2001 “Focus on Form Through Collaborative Dialogue: Exploring Task Effects.” In Researching Pedagogic Tasks. Second Language Learning, Teaching and Testing, ed. by Martin Bygate, Peter Skehan and Merrill Swain, 99–117. London: Longman.Google Scholar
2013 “A Vygotskian Sociocultural Perspective on Immersion Education: The L1/L2 Debate.” Journal of Immersion and Content-Based Language Education 1 (1): 101–129.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Swedish Schools Inspectorate
2010Språk-och Kunskapsutveckling för Barn Och Elever Med Annat Modersmål än Svenska [Language and Knowledge Development for Children and Students with Another Mother Tongue] (16). https://​www​.skolinspektionen​.se​/sv​/Beslut​-och​-rapporter​/Publikationer​/Granskningsrapport​/Kvalitetsgranskning​/Sprak​--och​-kunskapsutveckling​-for​-barn​-och​-elever​-med​-annat​-modersmal​-an​-svenska/.
Swedish Research Council
2002Forskningsetiska principer inom humanistisk-samhällsvetenskaplig forskning [Ethical Principles for Research in the Arts and Social Sciences]. Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet Tryck: Elanders Gotab. http://​www​.codex​.vr​.se​/texts​/HSFR​.pdf.
Tang, Jinlin
2002 “Using L1 in the English Classroom.” English Teaching Forum 40 (1): 36–43.Google Scholar
Tarone, Elaine, and Merrill Swain
1995 “A Sociolinguistic Perspective on Second Language Use in Immersion Classrooms.” The Modern Language Journal 79 (1): 166–178.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
ten Have, Paul
1989 “The Consultation as a Genre.” In Text and Talk as Social Practice: Discourse Difference and Division in Speech and Writing, ed. by Brian Torode, 115–135. Dordrecht, Holland: Foris Publications.Google Scholar
1999Doing Conversation Analysis: A Practical Guide. Los Angeles, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
2007Doing Conversation Analysis, 2nd edition. London: Sage Publications.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Theodórsdóttir, Guðrún, and Kolbrún Friðriksdóttir
2013 “Íslenskuþorpið: Leið til Pátttöku í Daglegum Samskiptum á Íslensku [The Icelandic Village: Guided Participation in interaction in Icelandic].” Milli Mála, 13–42.Google Scholar
Torras, Maria-Carme, and Joseph Gafaranga
2002 “Social Identities and Language Alternation in Non-formal Institutional Bilingual Talk: Trilingual Service Encounters in Barcelona. Language in Society 31: 527–548.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Tran, Huong Quynh
(2016) “Topic Extension in Discussions Among Learners of English in Vietnam”. Doctoral thesis, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.Google Scholar
“Transcription Key” [online]. Australian Journal of Communication 40 (2): 119–123. http://​search​.informit​.com​.au​/documentSummary;dn​=824008443500593;res​=IELAPA
Turnbull, Miles
2001 “There is a Role for the L1 in Second and Foreign Language Teaching, but . . .”. Canadian Modern Language Review 57 (4): 531–540.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Turnbull, Miles, and Kay Arnett
2002 “Teachers’ Uses of the Target and First Languages in Second and Foreign Language Classrooms.” Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 22: 204–218.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Turnbull, Miles, and Jennifer Dailey-O’Cain
(eds) 2009aFirst Language Use in Second and Foreign Language Learning. Bristol, Buffalo, Toronto: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
2009b “Introduction.” In First Language Use in Second and Foreign Language Learning, ed. by Miles Turnbull and Jennifer Dailey-O’Cain, 1–14. Bristol, Buffalo, Toronto: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Unamuno, Virginia
2008 “Multilingual Switch in Peer Classroom Interaction.” Linguistics and Education, 19: 1–19.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Üstünel, Eda
2004 “The Sequential Organization of Teacher-initiated and Teacher-induced Code-switching in a Turkish University EFL Setting.” Doctoral thesis, University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, The United Kingdom.Google Scholar
2016EFL Classroom Code-switching. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Üstünel, Eda, and Paul Seedhouse
2005 “Why That, in That Language, Right Now? Code-switching and Pedagogical Focus.” International Journal of Applied Linguistics 15 (3): 302–325.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
van der Meij, Hans, and Xiaoguang Zhao
2010 “Codeswitching in English Courses in Chinese Universities.” The Modern Language Journal 94 (3): 396–411. Crossref.Google Scholar
van der Walt, Christa
2009 “The Functions of Code Switching in English Language Learning Classes.” Per Linguam: A Journal of Language Learning 25 (1): 30–43.Google Scholar
van Langenhove, Luk, and Rom Harré
1993 “Positioning and Autobiography: Telling Your Life.” In Discourse and Lifespan Identity, ed. by Nikolas Coupland and Jon F. Nussbaum, 81–99. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Vu, Nha T. T., and Anne Burns
2014 “English as a Medium of Instruction: Challenges for Vietnamese Tertiary Lecturers.” The Journal of Asia TEFL 11 (3): 1–31. Crossref.Google Scholar
Vygotsky, Lev S.
1934/2008Myshlenie i Rech: Osnovopolagaiushchie Proisvedeniia. Klassika Otechestvennoi Psikhologii [Thought and Language: Main Works. Classics of Native Land psychology]. Moskva: Khranitel.Google Scholar
Wagner, Johannes
2015 “Designing for Language Learning in the Wild: Creating Social Infrastructures for Second Language Learning.” In Usage-based Perspectives on Second Language Learning, ed. by Teresa Cadierno and Søren W. Eskildsen, 75–101. Berlin, Germany: Mouton De Gruyter.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Walsh, Steve
2011Exploring Classroom Discourse: Language in Action. Abingdon, UK/New York, NY: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2012 “Conceptualising Classroom Interactional Competence.” Novitas-ROYAL (Research on Youth and Language) 6 (1): 1–14.Google Scholar
2016 “Applying Corpus Linguistics and Conversation Analysis in the Investigation of Samll Group Teaching in Higher Education.” In Working with Text and Around Text in Foreign Language Environments, ed. by Halina Chodkiewicz, Piotr Steinbrich and Malgorzata Krzemińska-Adamek, 205–222. Switzerland: Springer.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Waring, Hansun Z.
2016Theorizing Pedagogical Interaction: Insights from Conversation Analysis. New York: Taylor Francis.Google Scholar
Waring, Hansun Z., Catherine D. Box, and Sarah C. Creider
2016 “Problematizing Vocabulary in the Second Language Classroom: Unilateral and Bilateral Approaches.” Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice 10 (1): 87–108. Crossref.Google Scholar
2016 “Problematizing Vocabulary in the Second Language Classroom: Unilateral and Bilateral Approaches.” Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, Equinox 10 (1): 87–108.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Waring, Hansun Z., Sarah C. Creider, and Catherine D. Box
2013 “Explaining Vocabulary in the Second Language Classroom: A Conversation Analytic Account.” Learning, Culture and Social Interaction 2 (4): 249–264. Crossref.Google Scholar
Waters, Alan
2009 “Managing Innovation in English Language Education.” Language Teaching 42: 421–458.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Webb, Stuart, and Paul Nation
2017How Vocabulary is Learned. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Wei, Li
1994Three Generations, Two Languages, One Family: Language Choice and Language Shift in a Chinese Community in Britain. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
1998 “The Why and How Questions in the Analysis of Conversational Code-switching.” In Code-Switching in Conversation: Language, Interaction and Identity, ed. by Peter Auer, 156–176. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
2002 “What do You Want Me to Say? On the Conversation Analysis Approach to Bilingual Interaction.” Language in Society 31: 159–180.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005a “ ‘How Can You Tell?’ Towards a Common Sense Explanation of Conversational Code-switching.” Journal of Pragmatics 37: 375–389.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2005b “Starting from the Right Place: Introduction to the Special Issue on Conversational Code-Switching.” Journal of Pragmatics 37: 275–279.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2007 “A User-friendly Linguistics.” International Journal of Applied Linguistics 17: 117–119.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2011 “Multilinguality, Multimodality, and Multicompetence: Code- and Modeswitching by Minority Ethnic Children in Complementary Schools.” The Modern Language Journal 95 (3): 370–384.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2018 “Translanguaging as a Practical Theory of Language”. Applied Linguistics 39 (1): 9–30.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wei, Li and Chao-Jung Wu
2009 “Polite Chinese Children Revisited: Creativity and the Use of Codeswitching in the Chinese Complementary School Classroom.” International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 12 (2): 193–211.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Weinreich, Uriel
1953 [1963]Languages in Contact: Findings and Problems. The Hague: Mouton.Google Scholar
Whalen, Marilyn R., and Don E. Zimmerman
1990 “Describing Trouble: Epistemology in Citizens’ Call to the Police.” Language in Society 19: 465–492.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Whalen, Jack, Don E. Zimmerman, and Marilyn R. Whalen
1988 “When Words Fail: A Single Case Analysis.” Social Problems 35: 435–462.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wilkinson, Ray
2014 “Intervening with Conversation Analysis in Speech and Language Therapy: Improving Aphasic Conversation.” Research on Language and Social Interaction 47 (3): 219–238.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wilkinson, Sue
2011 “Improving Ethnic Monitoring on a Telephone Helpline.” In Applied Conversation Analysis: Intervention and Change in Institutional Talk, ed. by Charles Antaki, 119–139. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wong, Jean
2002 “Applying Conversation Analysis in Applied Linguistics: Evaluating Dialogue in English as a Second Language Textbooks.” International Review of Applied Linguistics 40 (1): 37–60.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2008 “Answering My Call: A Look at Telephone Closings.” In Conversation Analysis and Language, ed. by Hugo Bowles and Paul Seedhouse, 271–304. Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Wong, Jean, and Hansun Z. Waring
2010Conversation Analysis and Second Language Pedagogy: A Guide for ESL/EFL Teachers. New York, NY: Routledge.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wooffitt, Robin
2001 “Researching Psychic Practitioners: Conversation Analysis.” In Discourse as Data, ed. by Margaret Wetherell, Stephanie Taylor and Simeon J. Yates, 49–9. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
2005Conversation Analysis and Discourse Analysis. London: Sage Publications.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
You, Hie-Jung
2015 “Reference to Shared Past Events and Memories.” Journal of Pragmatics 87: 238–250.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Young, Richard, and Agnes W. He
1998Talking and Testing: Discourse Approaches to the Assessment of Oral Proficiency. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Zemel, Alan, and Timothy Koschmann
2011 “Pursuing a question: Reinitiating IRE sequences as a method of instruction.” Journal of Pragmatics 43 (2): 475–488.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Zhu, Hua, Paul Seedhouse, Li Wei, and Vivian Cook
(eds) 2007Language Learning/Teaching as Social (Inter)Action. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Ziegler, Gudrun, Olcay Sert, and Natalia Durusa
2012 “Student-initiated Use of Multilingual Resources in English-language Classroom Interaction: Next-turn Management.” Classroom Discourse 3 (2): 187–204.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018023342 | Marc record