Modes of Modality

Modality, typology, and universal grammar

Editors
Elisabeth Leiss | University of Munich
Werner Abraham | University of Vienna
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027206169 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027270795 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
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The volume aims at a universal definition of modality or “illocutionary/speaker’s perspective force” that is strong enough to capture the entire range of different subtypes and varieties of modalities in different languages. The central idea is that modality is all-pervasive in language. This perspective on modality allows for the integration of covert modality as well as peripheral instances of modality in neglected domains such as the modality of insufficieny, of attitudinality, or neglected domains such as modality and illocutionary force in finite vs. nonfinite and factive vs. non-factive subordinated clauses. In most languages, modality encompasses modal verbs both in their root and epistemic meanings, at least where these languages have the principled distribution between root and epistemic modality in the first place (which is one fundamentally restricted, in its strict qualitative and quantitative sense, to the Germanic languages). In addition, this volume discusses one other intricate and partially highly mysterious class of modality triggers: modal particles as they are sported in the Germanic languages (except for English). It is argued in the contributions and the languages discussed in this volume how modal verbs and adverbials, next to modal particles, are expressed, how they are interlinked with contextual factors such as aspect, definiteness, person, verbal factivity, and assertivity as opposed to other attitudinal types. An essential concept used and argued for is perspectivization (a sub-concept of possible world semantics). Language groups covered in detail and compared are Slavic, Germanic, and South East Asian. The volume will interest researchers in theoretical and applied linguistics, typology, the semantics/pragmatics interface, and language philosophy as it is part of a larger project developing an alternative approach to Universal Grammar that is compatible with functionalist approaches.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 149] 2014.  vi, 511 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Cited by

Cited by 7 other publications

Abraham, Werner
2017. Paradigmatics precedes syntagmatics in language evolution?Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy,The evolution of morphology. Word Structure 10:1  pp. 100 ff. DOI logo
Abraham, Werner
2019. What are the guiding principles in the evolution of language: Paradigmatics or syntagmatics?. Evolutionary Linguistic Theory 1:2  pp. 109 ff. DOI logo
Abraham, Werner
2020. Modality in Syntax, Semantics and Pragmatics, DOI logo
Ayoun, Dalila, Agnès Celle & Laure Lansari
2018. Chapter 1. Introduction. In Tense, Aspect, Modality, and Evidentiality [Studies in Language Companion Series, 197],  pp. 1 ff. DOI logo
Bayer, Josef, Roland Hinterhölzl & Andreas Trotzke
2015. Issues in discourse-oriented syntax. In Discourse-oriented Syntax [Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today, 226],  pp. 1 ff. DOI logo
Lindström, Liina & Kristel Uiboaed
2017. Syntactic variation in ‘need’-constructions in Estonian dialects. Nordic Journal of Linguistics 40:3  pp. 313 ff. DOI logo
Mahmoudi, Amin, Dariusz Jemielniak & Leon Ciechanowski
2024. Echo Chambers in Online Social Networks: A Systematic Literature Review. IEEE Access 12  pp. 9594 ff. DOI logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 17 february 2024. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Main BIC Subject

CFK: Grammar, syntax

Main BISAC Subject

LAN009000: LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
ONIX Metadata
ONIX 2.1
ONIX 3.0
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2013041819 | Marc record