Typological Hierarchies in Synchrony and Diachrony

Editors
| University of Pavia
| University of Bern
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027200266 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027264459 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Typological hierarchies are widely perceived as one of the most important results of research on language universals and linguistic diversity. Explanations for typological hierarchies, however, are usually based on the synchronic properties of the patterns described by individual hierarchies, not the actual diachronic processes that give rise to these patterns cross-linguistically. This book aims to explore in what ways the investigation of such processes can further our understanding of typological hierarchies. To this end, diachronic evidence about the origins of several phenomena described by typological hierarchies is discussed for several languages by a number of leading scholars in typology, historical linguistics, and language documentation. This evidence suggests a rethinking of possible explanations for typological hierarchies, as well as the very notion of typological universals in general. For this reason, the book will be of interest not only to the broad typological community, but also historical linguists, cognitive linguists, and psycholinguists.
[Typological Studies in Language, 121]  2018.  vi, 434 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Part I. Setting the stage
4–27
Synchronic vs. diachronic approaches to typological hierarchies
Sonia Cristofaro and Fernando Zúñiga
4–27
Part II. Foundational issues
32–128
Chapter 1. Evolutionary Phonology and the life cycle of voiceless sonorants
Juliette Blevins
29–58
Chapter 2. The Obligatory Coding Principle in diachronic perspective
Denis Creissels
59–110
Chapter 3. Deconstructing teleology: The place of synchronic usage patterns among processes of diachronic development
Marianne Mithun
111–128
Part III. Hierarchical effects and their origins
132–342
Chapter 4. The development of referential hierarchy effects in Sahaptian
Spike Gildea and Joana Jansen
129–190
Chapter 5. Diachrony and the referential hierarchy in Old Irish
Aaron Griffith
191–216
Chapter 6. From ergative case-marking to hierarchical agreement: A reconstruction of the argument-marking system of Reyesano (Takanan, Bolivia)
Antoine Guillaume
217–256
Chapter 7. The direction(s) of analogical change in direct/inverse systems
Guillaume Jacques and Anton Antonov
257–288
Chapter 8. Are the Tupi-Guarani hierarchical indexing systems really motivated by the person hierarchy?
Françoise Rose
289–308
Chapter 9. Incipient hierarchical alignment in four Central Salish languages from the Proto-Salish middle
Zalmai Zahir
309–342
Part IV. Conflicting hierarchical patterns and how to deal with them
346–424
Chapter 10. Deictic and sociopragmatic effects in Tibeto-Burman SAP indexation
Scott DeLancey
343–376
Chapter 11. Morphosyntactic coding of proper names and its implications for the Animacy Hierarchy
Johannes Helmbrecht, Lukas Denk, Sarah Thanner and Ilenia Tonetti
377–402
Chapter 12. Generic person marking in Japhug and other Gyalrong languages
Guillaume Jacques
403–424
Author index
425–428
Language Index
429–431
Subject Index
433–434
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Chappell, Hilary & Jean‐Christophe Verstraete
2019. Optional and alternating case marking: Typology and diachrony. Language and Linguistics Compass 13:3  pp. e12311 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 30 june 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009010 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2017059003