Bilingualism

A framework for understanding the mental lexicon

Editors
| University of British Columbia
| City University of New York
| Brock University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027243775 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027264893 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
In the world today, bilingualism is more common than monolingualism. Thus, the default mental lexicon may in fact be the bilingual lexicon. More than ever, social and technological innovation have created a situation in which lexical knowledge may change dramatically throughout an individual’s lifetime. This book offers a new perspective for the understanding of these phenomena and their consequences for the representation of words in the mind and brain. Contributing authors are leaders in the field who provide a re-analysis of key assumptions and a re-focusing of research. They bring new insights and new findings that advance the understanding of both bilingualism and the mental lexicon. This volume serves to generate new directions and advances in bilingualism research.
[Bilingual Processing and Acquisition, 6]  2017.  xvii, 252 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Author information
ix–xii
Prologue: Polyglossia as a personal journey
Gonia Jarema
xiii–xviii
The dynamic lexicon: Complex words in bilingual minds
Maya Libben, Mira Goral and Gary Libben
1–6
Languages without borders: Reframing the study of the bilingual mental lexicon
Jyotsna Vaid and Renata F. I. Meuter
7–26
The bilingual lexicon: A window into language dynamics and cognition
Judith F. Kroll
27–48
Mechanisms underlying word learning in second language acquisition
Gabriela Meade and Ton Dijkstra
49–72
The bilingual mental lexicon: A dynamic knowledge system
Ladan Ghazi-Saidi, Tanya Dash and Ana Inès Ansaldo
73–102
Non-selective language activation and bilingualism as the default mental lexicon
Maya Libben
103–122
The influence of contextual cues on representations in the mental lexicon for bilinguals
Kalinka Timmer, John G. Grundy and Ellen Bialystok
123–142
When cognate status produces no benefits: Investigating cognate effects during the processing of code-switched sentences
Paola E. Dussias, Jorge R. Valdés Kroff and Rosa E. Guzzardo Tamargo
143–180
Lexical retrieval difficulty in bilingual speakers with and without pathology
Mira Goral
181–196
Morphological integration and the bilingual lexicon
Gary Libben, Mira Goral and Harald Baayen
197–216
Morphological processing in old-age bilinguals
Harald Clahsen and Jana Reifegerste
217–248
Index
249–252
“The works in this volume are based on a truly provocative assumption—that to properly understand the mental lexicon, bilingualism is the correct default context for studying it. For this reason alone, this collection makes a significant contribution. The chapters, all written by leading researchers, provide thorough and compelling analyses, and touch on a comprehensive range of ways to think about the dynamic and integrated nature of the mental lexicon. Graduate students and seasoned researchers alike will profit from the wealth of ideas in this volume. This is a must-have reference for all mental lexicon theorists and researchers.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

DIJKSTRA, TON, ALEXANDER WAHL, FRANKA BUYTENHUIJS, NINO VAN HALEM, ZINA AL-JIBOURI, MARCEL DE KORTE & STEVEN REKKÉ
2019. Modelling bilingual lexical processing: A research agenda and desiderabilia. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 22:04  pp. 703 ff. Crossref logo
Libben, Gary & John W. Schwieter
2019.  In The Handbook of the Neuroscience of Multilingualism,  pp. 297 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 20 september 2019. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFDM – Bilingualism & multilingualism
BISAC Subject: LAN009040 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Psycholinguistics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2017035846