Language Acquisition Studies in Generative Grammar

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This is a collection of essays on the native and non-native acquisition of syntax within the Principles and Parameters framework. In line with current methodology in the study of adult grammars, language acquisition is studied here from a comparative perspective. The unifying theme is the issue of the 'initial state' of grammatical knowledge: For native language, the important controversy is that between the Continuity approach, which holds that Universal Grammar is essentially constant throughout development, and the Maturation approach, which maintains that portions of UG are subject to maturation. For non-native language, the theme of initial states concerns the extent of native-grammar influence. Different views regarding the continuity question are defended in the papers on first language acquisition. Evidence from the acquisition of, inter alia, Bernese, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Icelandic, Italian and Japanese, is brought to bear on issues pertaining to clause structure, null subjects, verb position, negation, Case marking, modality, non-finite sentences, root questions, long-distance questions and scrambling. The views defended on the initial state of (adult) second language acquisition also differ: from complete L1 influence to different versions of partial L1 influence. While the target language is German in these studies, the native language varies: Korean, Spanish and Turkish. Analyses invoke UG principles to account for verb placement, null subjects, verbal morphology and Case marking. Though many issues remain, the volume highlights the growing ties between formal linguistics and language acquisition research. Such an approach provides the foundation for asking the right questions and putting them to empirical test.
[Language Acquisition and Language Disorders, 8]  1994.  xii, 401 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Tables and Figures
vii
Abbreviations
ix
Contributors
xi
Introduction: On the initial states of language acquisition
Teun Hoekstra and Bonnie D. Schwartz
1
VP, Null Arguments and COMP Projections
Nina Hyams
21
Crosslinguistic Evidence for Functional Projections in Early Child Grammar
Viviane Déprez and Amy Pierce
57
The Seeds of Structure: A Syntactic analysis of the acquisition of Case marking
Harald Clahsen, Sonja Eisenbeiss and Anne Vainikka
85
From Ajunct to Head
Teun Hoekstra and Peter Jordens
119
Early Null Subjects and Root Null Subjects
Luigi Rizzi
151
Asking Questions without CP’s? On the Acquisition of Root wh-questions in Bernese Swiss German and Standard German
Zvi Penner
177
Succesful Cyclic Movement
Rosalind Thornton and Stephen Crain
215
Early Acquisition of Scrambling in Japanese
Yukio Otsu
253
Direct Access to X’-Theory: Evidence from Korean and Turkish adults learning German
Anne Vainikka and Martha Young-Scholten
265
Word Order and Nominative Case in Non-Native Language Acquisition: A longitudinal study of (L1 Turkish) German Interlanguage
Bonnie D. Schwartz and Rex A. Sprouse
317
Optionality and the Initial State in L2 Development
Lynn Eubank
369
Index of Languages
389
Index of Names
391
Index of Subjects
397
Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  93043090
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