Emotion in Discourse

Editors
| VU Amsterdam
| UNED, Madrid
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027202390 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027262776 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Interest in human emotion no longer equates to unscientific speculation. 21st-century humanities scholars are paying serious attention to our capacity to express emotions and giving rigorous explanations of affect in language. We are unquestionably witnessing an ‘emotional turn’ not only in linguistics, but also in other fields of scientific research.

Emotion in Discourse follows from and reflects on this scholarly awakening to the world of emotion, and in particular, to its intricate relationship with human language. The book presents both the state of the art and the latest research in an effort to unravel the various workings of the expression of emotion in discourse. It takes an interdisciplinary approach, for emotion is a multifarious phenomenon whose functions in language are enlightened by such other disciplines as psychology, neurology, or communication studies. The volume shows not only how emotion manifests at different linguistic levels, but also how it relates to aspects like linguistic appraisal, emotional intelligence or humor, as well as covering its occurrence in various genres, including scientific discourse. As such, the book contributes to an emerging interdisciplinary field which could be labeled “emotionology”, transcending previous linguistic work and providing an updated characterization of how emotion functions in human discourse.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 302]  2019.  xi, 397 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
xi
Introduction
1–26
Chapter 1. Emotion processes in discourse
Laura Alba-Juez and J. Lachlan Mackenzie
3–26
Section I. Emotion, syntax and the lexicon
Chapter 2. The multifunctionality of swear/taboo words in television series
Monika Bednarek
29–54
Chapter 3. The syntax of an emotional expletive in English
J. Lachlan Mackenzie
55–86
Chapter 4. Interjections and emotions: The case of gosh
Angela Downing and Elena Martínez Caro
87–112
Chapter 5. Expressing emotions without emotional lexis: A crosslinguistic approach to the phraseology of the emotions in Spanish and English
Ruth Breeze and Manuel Casado-Velarde
113–138
Chapter 6. The value of left and right
Ad Foolen
139–158
Section II. Pragmatics and emotion
Chapter 7. A cognitive pragmatics of the phatic Internet
Francisco Yus
161–188
Chapter 8. Humor and mirth: Emotions, embodied cognition, and sustained humor
Salvatore Attardo
189–212
Chapter 9. My anger was justified surely?: Epistemic markers across British English and German Emotion Events
Nina-Maria Fronhofer
213–244
Section III. Interdisciplinary studies
Chapter 10. Emotion and language ‘at work’: The relationship between Trait Emotional Intelligence and communicative competence as manifested at the workplace
Laura Alba-Juez and Juan-Carlos Pérez-González
247–278
Chapter 11. The effects of linguistic proficiency, Trait Emotional Intelligence and in-group advantage on emotion recognition by British and American English L1 users
Jean-Marc Dewaele, Pernelle Lorette and Konstantinos V. Petrides
279–300
Chapter 12. Rethinking Martin & White’s affect taxonomy: A psychologically-inspired approach to the linguistic expression of emotion
Miguel-Ángel Benítez-Castro and Encarnación Hidalgo-Tenorio
301–332
Section IV. Emotion in different discourse types
Chapter 13. Victims, heroes and villains in newsbites: A Critical Discourse Analysis of the Spanish eviction crisis in El País
Isabel Alonso Belmonte
335–356
Chapter 14. Promoemotional science?: Emotion and intersemiosis in graphical abstracts
Carmen Sancho Guinda
357–386
Name index
387–394
Subject index
395–397
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Dewaele, Jean-Marc, Xinjie Chen, Amado M. Padilla & J. Lake
2019. The Flowering of Positive Psychology in Foreign Language Teaching and Acquisition Research. Frontiers in Psychology 10 Crossref logo

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Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018053674