Language Variation - European Perspectives V

Selected papers from the Seventh International Conference on Language Variation in Europe (ICLaVE 7), Trondheim, June 2013

Editors
| Sør-Trøndelag University College
| Sør-Trøndelag University College
| Norwegian University of Science and Technology
| University of Oslo
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027234971 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027268815 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
Language Variation – European Perspectives V is based on papers presented at the Seventh International Conference on Language Variation in Europe (ICLaVE 7), which was held in Trondheim, Norway from 26 to 28 June 2013. The 17 papers included in the book explore phonetic and phonological variation (Bitenc and Kenda-Jež; Hildenbrandt and Moosmüller; Jansen; Schaufuß; Schleef, Flynn and Ramsammy; Stuart-Smith, Rathcke, Sonderegger and Macdonald), morphology (Padilla-Moyano), syntax (Christensen and Juel Jensen; Jónsson, Brynjólfsdóttir and Sverrisdóttir), morphosyntax (Auger and Wycoff; Cerruti and Regis), language ideology, linguistic practices and language attitudes (Strand; Hall-Lew, Fairs and Lew; Dunmore and Smith-Christmas), code-switching (Amadou; Bucher) and language documentation (Kühl). The book is essential reading for scholars working on variation and change in European languages. The articles in the present volume investigate Romani, Turkish, Greek, Slovene, Picard, Swiss-German, Basque, Danish, Italian, English, Gaelic, Icelandic Sign Language, Faroe Danish and Norwegian.
[Studies in Language Variation, 17]  2015.  xiii, 240 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
Eivind Torgersen, Stian Hårstad, Brit Mæhlum and Unn Røyneland
vii–xiv
A corpus-driven analysis of Romani in contact with Turkish and Greek
Evangelia Adamou
1–16
How many ands in Picard?
Julie Auger and Jake Wycoff
17–30
Language variation in Slovene: A case study of two geographically mobile speakers
Maja Bitenc and Karmen Kenda-Jež
31–42
Code-switching in SMS communication: Formal and functional aspects in the Swiss-German sms4science corpus
Claudia Bucher
43–54
The interplay between dialect and standard: Evidence from Italo-Romance
Massimo Cerruti and Riccardo Regis
55–68
Word order variation and foregrounding of complement clauses: Exploring the meaning of sentence adverbials as signals of word order
Tanya Karoli Christensen and Torben Juel Jensen
69–86
Voicing the ‘other’: Code-switching in discourses of Gaelic language ideologies
Stuart S. Dunmore and Cassie Smith-Christmas
87–98
Tourists’ attitudes towards linguistic variation in Scotland
Lauren Hall-Lew, Amie Fairs and Alan A. Lew
99–110
The pronunciation of -ig in three varieties of Austria
Tina Hildenbrandt and Sylvia Moosmüller
111–128
A century of change in prevocalic (r) in Carlisle English: Internal constraints in a levelling process
Sandra Jansen
129–144
Variation in wh-questions in Icelandic Sign Language
Jóhannes Gísli Jónsson, Elísa Guðrún Brynjólfsdóttir and Rannveig Sverrisdóttir
145–156
Faroe Danish: An unknown variety
Karoline Kühl
157–168
A new view of Basque through eighteenth-century correspondence
Manuel Padilla-Moyano
169–182
Standard-dialect variation and its functionalization
Anja Schaufuß
183–196
Production and perception of (ing) in Manchester English
Erik Schleef, Nicholas Flynn and Michael Ramsammy
197–210
Pro-dialect practices and linguistic commodification in rural Valdres, Norway
Thea R. Strand
211–224
A real-time study of plosives in Glaswegian using an automatic measurement algorithm: Change or age-grading?
Jane Stuart-Smith, Tamara Rathcke, Morgan Sonderegger and Rachel Macdonald
225–238
Index
239–240
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFB – Sociolinguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014046966