Usage-Based Studies in Modern Hebrew

Background, Morpho-lexicon, and Syntax

Editor
| Tel Aviv University
Assistant Editor
| Tel Aviv University
Cooperation
| The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
| University of Haifa
| The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027204196 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027262066 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
The goal of the volume is to shed fresh light on Modern Hebrew from perspectives aimed at readers interested in the domains of general linguistics, typology, and Semitic studies. Starting with chapters that provide background information on the evolution and sociolinguistic setting of the language, the bulk of the book is devoted to usage-based studies of the morphology, lexicon, and syntax of current Hebrew. Based primarily on original analyses of authentic spoken and online materials, these studies reflect varied theoretical frames-of-reference that are largely model-neutral in approach. To this end, the book presents a functionally motivated, dynamic approach to actual usage, rather than providing strictly structuralist or formal characterizations of particular linguistic systems. Such a perspective is particularly important in the case of a language undergoing accelerated processes of change, in which the gap between prescriptive dictates of the Hebrew Language Establishment and the actual usage of educated, literate but non-expert speaker-writers of current Hebrew is constantly on the rise.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 210]  2020.  xviii, 682 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of authors
vii
Acknowledgements
ix
Transcription and Coding. Transcription, transliteration, Hebrew-specific coding
xi–xviii
Introduction
Ruth A. Berman and Elitzur Dattner
1–15
Part I. General background
17–143
Chapter 1. Setting Modern Hebrew in space, time, and culture
Eitan Grossman and Yael Reshef
19–26
Chapter 2. Historical overview of Modern Hebrew
Yael Reshef
27–39
Chapter 3. Genetic affiliation
Aaron D. Rubin
41–49
Chapter 4. Sociolinguistics of Modern Hebrew
Roni Henkin
51–95
Chapter 5. Prescriptive activity in Modern Hebrew
Uri Mor
97–129
Chapter 6. Notes on Modern Hebrew phonology and orthography
Stav Klein
131–143
Part II. Morpho-lexicon
145–418
Chapter 7. Inflection
Ora R. Schwarzwald
147–202
Chapter 8. Derivation
Dorit Ravid
203–264
Chapter 9. Parts of speech categories in the lexicon of Modern Hebrew
Shmuel Bolozky and Ruth A. Berman
265–330
Chapter 10. Voice distinctions
Dana Taube
331–374
Chapter 11. Nominalizations
Ruth A. Berman
375–418
Part III. Syntax
419–676
Chapter 12. Agreement alternations in Modern Hebrew
Nurit Melnik
421–464
Chapter 13. Transitivity and valence
Rivka Halevy
465–506
Chapter 14. Genitive (smixut) constructions in Modern Hebrew
Ruth A. Berman
507–537
Chapter 15. Impersonal and pseudo-impersonal constructions
Rivka Halevy
539–582
Chapter 16. Negation in Modern Hebrew
Leon Shor
583–621
Chapter 17. List constructions
Anna Inbar
623–658
Chapter 18. A usage-based typology of Modern Hebrew syntax: How Semitic?
Bracha Nir
659–676
References
Index
677–682
References

References

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2007Chapter 44: Hebrew. In The International Perspective on Speech Acquisition, Sharynne McLeod (ed.), 437–456. Clifton Park, NY: Thomas Delmar Learning.Google Scholar
Berman, Ruth A.
2016Typology, acquisition, and development: The view from Israeli Hebrew. In Acquisition and Development of Hebrew: From Infancy to Adolescence [Trends In Language Acquisition Research 19], Ruth A. Berman (ed.), 1–38. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
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Comrie, Bernard, Haspelmath, Martin & Bickel, Balthasar
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF/2CSJ – Linguistics/Hebrew
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2019030428