Above and Beyond the Segments

Experimental linguistics and phonetics

Editors
| Leiden University
| Leiden University
| Leiden University
| Leiden University
| Leiden University
| Leiden University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027212160 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269065 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
Above and Beyond the Segments presents a unique collection of experimental linguistic and phonetic research. Mainly, it deals with the experimental approach to prosodic, and more specifically melodic, aspects of speech. But it also treats segmental phonetics and phonology, second language learning, semantics and related topics.
Apart from European languages and dialects (including Dutch, English, Greek, Danish, and dialects from Italy and The Netherlands) there also are chapters on regions as widespread as China, Russia, South Africa, South Sudan, and Surinam. These all testify the enormous diversity of language and speech in the world.
This book is of special interest to linguists working on prosodic aspects of speech in general and to those studying non-Western languages in particular.
[Not in series, 189]  2014.  xii, 363 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Foreword
xi–xii
Tone and stress in North-West Indo-Aryan: A survey
Joan Baart
1–13
Whose voice is that? Challenges in forensic phonetics
Tina Cambier-Langeveld, Maya van Rossum and Jos Vermeulen
14–27
Pitch accent placement in Dutch as a second language: An exploratory investigation
Johanneke Caspers
28–41
The problems of adverbs in Zulu
Lisa Lai-Shen Cheng and Laura J. Downing
42–59
Meaningful grammar is binary, local, anti-symmetric, recursive and incomplete
Crit Cremers and Maarten Hijzelendoorn
60–70
How prosody is both mandatory and optional
Anne Cutler and James McQueen
71–82
No Stress Typology
Rob Goedemans and Ellen van Zanten
83–95
The effect of pause insertion on the intelligibility of Danish among Swedes
Charlotte Gooskens and Renée van Bezooijen
96–108
Intonation, bias and Greek NPIs: A perception experiment
Stella Gryllia
109–119
Information status and L2 prosody: A study of reference maintenance in Chinese learners of Dutch
Yan Gu and Aoju Chen
120–130
Does boundary tone production in whispered speech depend on its bearer? Exploring a case of tonal crowding in whisper
Willemijn Heeren
131–143
The primacy of the weak in Carib prosody
Berend J. Hoff
144–151
The effects of age and level of education on the ability of adult native speakers of Dutch to segment speech into words
Jan H. Hulstijn and Sible Andringa
152–164
Doing grammatical semantics as if it were phonetics
Robert S. Kirsner
165–173
Phonetic aspects of polar questions in Sienese: An experimental approach
Sara Lusini, Roberta D'Alessandro and Johan Rooryck
174–188
Etymological sub-lexicons constrain the graphematic solution space
Anneke Neijt
189–202
Do speakers try to distract attention from their speech errors? The prosody of self-repairs
Sieb G. Nooteboom and Quené Hugo
203–217
Field notes from a phonetician on Tundra Yukaghir orthography
Cecilia Odé
218–229
Cross-regional differences in the perception of fricative devoicing
Anne-France Pinget, Hans Van de Velde and René Kager
230–245
Evidence for three-level vowel length in Ageer Dinka
Bert Remijsen
246–260
Phonetic accounts of timed responses in syllable monitoring experiments
Toni Rietveld and Niels O. Schiller
261–274
The independent effects of prosodic structure and information status on tonal coarticulation: Evidence from Wenzhou Chinese
Franziska Scholz and Yiya Chen
275–287
The acoustics of English vowels in the speech of Dutch learners before and after pronunciation training
Dick Smakman and Thomas De France
288–301
The use of Chinese dialects: Increasing or decreasing? Survey on the use of Chongqing dialect
Chaoju Tang
302–310
Durational effects of phrasal stress
Alice Turk
311–322
The Laryngeal Class in RcvP and Voice phenomena in Dutch
Harry van der Hulst
323–349
Affricates in English as a natural class
Jeroen van de Weijer
350–358
Index
359–363
“[T]his volume is rich in material in many areas of phonetics and phonology, and can benefit many readers interested in the discussed areas and languages.”
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFH – Phonetics, phonology
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014039652