Language Contact and Change in Mesoamerica and Beyond

Editors
| Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
| University of California, Los Angeles
| California State University, Fullerton
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027259509 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027265715 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Language-contact phenomena in Mesoamerica and adjacent regions present an exciting field for research that has the potential to significantly contribute to our understanding of language contact and the role that it plays in language change. This volume presents and analyzes fresh empirical data from living and/or extinct Mesoamerican languages (from the Mayan, Uto-Aztecan, Totonac-Tepehuan and Otomanguean groups), neighboring non-Mesoamerican languages (Apachean, Arawakan, Andean languages), as well as Spanish. Language-contact effects in these diverse languages and language groups are typically analyzed by different subfields of linguistics that do not necessarily interact with one another. It is hoped that this volume, which contains works from different scholarly traditions that represent a variety of approaches to the study of language contact, will contribute to the lessening of this compartmentalization. The volume is relevant to researchers of language contact and contact-induced change and to anyone interested both in the historical development and present features of indigenous languages of the Americas and Latin American Spanish.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 185]  2017.  xv, 433 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix–x
Contributors
Abbreviations and acronyms
xi–xii
Chapter 1. Language contact in Mesoamerica and beyond
Karen Dakin and Natalie Operstein
2–28
Chapter 2. Spanish influence in two Tepehua languages: Structure-preserving, structure-changing, and structure-preferring effects
James K. Watters
30–54
Chapter 3. Spanish infinitives borrowed into Zapotec light verb constructions
Rosemary G. Beam de Azcona
56–80
Chapter 4. The effect of external factors on the perception of sounds in Meꞌphaa
Stephen A. Marlett
82–104
Chapter 5. Sociolinguistic factors in loanword prosody
Natalie Operstein
106–124
Chapter 6. Some grammatical characteristics of the Spanish spoken by Lacandón and Mazahua bilinguals
Sergio Ibañez Cerda, Israel Martínez Corripio and Armando Mora-Bustos
126–153
Chapter 7. Spanish loanwords in Amerindian languages and their implications for the reconstruction of the pronunciation of Spanish in Mesoamerica
Claudia Parodi
156–169
Chapter 8. Loanword evidence for dialect mixing in colonial American Spanish
Natalie Operstein
172–186
Chapter 9. The impact of language contact in Nahuatl couplets
Mercedes Montes de Oca Vega
188–208
Chapter 10. Spanish–Huastec (Mayan) 16th-century language contact attested in the Doctrina Christiana en la lengua guasteca by Friar Juan de la Cruz, 1571
Lucero Meléndez Guadarrama
210–227
Chapter 11. Historical review of loans in Chichimec (c.1767–2012)
Yolanda Lastra
230–235
Chapter 12. Nahuatl L2 texts from Northern Nueva Galicia: Indigenous language contact in the seventeenth century
Rosa H. Yáñez Rosales
238–261
Chapter 13. Western and Central Nahua dialects: Possible influences from contact with Cora and Huichol
Karen Dakin
264–300
Chapter 14. Loanwords in Apachean from indigenous languages of the Southwest
Willem J. de Reuse
302–318
Chapter 15. Language contact across the Andes: The case of Mochica and Hibito-Cholón
Rita Eloranta
320–334
Chapter 16. The Mesoamerican linguistic area revisited
Pamela Munro
336–353
Chapter 17. Language diversity, contact and change in the Americas: The model of Filippo Salvatore Gilij (1721–1789)
Matthias Pache, Arjan Mossel and Willem F. H. Adelaar
356–383
Chapter 18. Spanish in the Americas: A dialogic approach to language contact
Marta Luján
386–417
Index of subjects and terms
419–424
Index of authors
425–426
Index of place, person and ethnic group names
427–428
Index of languages
429–433
Index of subjects and terms
419
Language Contact and Change in Mesoamerica and Beyond contains high-quality articles of interest to Mesoamericanists, historical linguists, sociolinguists, and any scholar interested in language-contact effects. The chapters include detailed descriptions of linguistic phenomena that reveal the complexity, layering, and interwoven nature of language contact.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Hickey, Raymond
2020.  In The Handbook of Language Contact,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 29 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Erratum

IMPORTANT INFORMATION 
During the printing process of this book an unfortunate error occurred: page 201 was replaced by page 211 of the same book. You will find the correct page here

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009010 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2017004879 | Marc record