Transfer Effects in Multilingual Language Development

Editor
| University of Hamburg
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027214171 | EUR 75.00 | USD 113.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027268693 | EUR 75.00 | USD 113.00
 
This volume, dedicated to language transfer, starts out with state-of-the-art psycholinguistic approaches to language transfer involving studies on psycho-typological transfer, lexical interference and foreign accent. The next chapter on Transfer in Language Learning, Contact, and Change presents new empirical data from several languages (English, German, Russian, French, Italian) on various transfer phenomena ranging from second language acquisition and contact-induced change in word order to cross-linguistic influences in word formation and the lexicon. Transfer in Applied Linguistics scrutinizes, on the one hand, the external sources of language transfer by investigating bilingual resources and the school context, but also by pointing out the differences in academic language in multilingual adolescents. On the other hand, internal sources of language transfer in multilingual classrooms are illuminated. A final chapter directs its focus on methodological issues that arise when more than one language is studied systematically and it offers a solution on causal effects for the investigation of heritage language proficiencies. The chapter also includes studies that exploit more innovative methodologies on L1 identification and clitic acquisition.
[Hamburg Studies on Linguistic Diversity, 4]  2015.  ix, 353 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix–x
Transfer effects in multilingual language development
Hagen Peukert
1–18
Psycholinguistic Approaches to Language Transfer
The relationship between L3 transfer and structural similarity across development: Raising across an experiencer in Brazilian Portuguese
Jennifer Cabrelli, João Felipe Amaro and Jason Rothman
21–52
Segmental targets versus lexical interference: Production of second-language targets on first exposure and the result of minimal training
Susanne Elizabeth Carroll and Joseph W. Windsor
53–86
Foreign accent in heritage speakers of Turkish in Germany
Ilse Stangen, Tanja Kupisch, Anna Lia Proietti Ergün and Marina Zielke
87–108
Transfer in Language Learning and Language Contact
Lexical cross-linguistic influence in third language development
Camilla Bardel
111–128
Effects of cross-linguistic influence in word formation: A comparative learner-corpus study of advanced interlanguage production
Marcus Callies
129–146
Transfer effects in the acquisition of English as an additional language by bilingual children in Germany
Peter Siemund and Simone Lechner
147–160
Let’s fix it? Cross-linguistic influence in word order patterns of Russian heritage speakers in Germany
Bernhard Brehmer and Irina Usanova
161–188
Transfer in Applied Linguistics
Assessing foreign language speech rhythm in multilingual learners: An interdisciplinary approach
Christoph Gabriel, Johanna Stahnke and Jeanette Thulke
191–220
Cross-linguistic transfer of academic language in multilingual adolescents
Joana Duarte
221–248
Bilingual resources and school context: Case studies from Germany and Turkey
Ulrich Mehlem and Yazgül Şimşek
249–274
Methodology on Transfer
Do immigrant children profit from heritage language proficiencies?
Thorsten Klinger
277–296
Automated L1 identification in English learner essays and its implications for language transfer
Egon Stemle and Alexander Onysko
297–321
The nature of the initial state of child L2 grammar: Contributions from the syntax of clitics
Enkeleida Kapia
323–344
List of Indices
345–348
Name Index
349–354
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFDC – Language acquisition
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2015000838 | Marc record