Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory 15

Selected papers from 'Going Romance' 30, Frankfurt

Editors
| Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
| Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
| Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
| Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027203373 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027262370 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
In 2016, the Going Romance conference series celebrated its 30th edition and the Goethe University of Frankfurt (Germany) had the honor of organizing this.

The edited volume at hand presents a selection of 17 peer-reviewed articles, based on papers that were presented at this occasion. The volume covers a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from morphosyntax to prosody. Some are discussed from a synchronic perspective, others from a diachronic perspective, or in the context of language acquisition. In addition to frequently-studied languages such as French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish, this volume features lesser-studied varieties including Aromanian, Gallo, and Sardinian.

[Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory, 15]  2019.  vii, 358 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
2–6
Part I. Sentence types and structures in Romance
10–132
Chapter 1. Against V2 as a general property of Old Romance languages
Ana Maria Martins
10–33
Chapter 2. Portuguese as a heritage language in contact with German and French: A comparative study on the acquisition of verbal mood
Cristina Flores, Ana Lúcia Santos, Laetitia de Almeida, Alice Jesus and Rui Marques
36–52
Chapter 3. Negative Concord and sentential negation in Gallo
Nicolas Guilliot and Samantha Becerra-Zita
54–71
Chapter 4. At the crossroads between (semi-)free relatives and indirect questions in French
Ingrid Konrad
74–91
Chapter 5. Point of view on causal clauses: The case of French parce que and puisque
Isabelle Charnavel
94–112
Chapter 6. Historical pragmatics, explicit activation and wh in situ in French
Pierre Larrivée
114–132
Part II. The prosodic view on sentences in Romance
136–196
Chapter 7. Intonation of alternative constructions in French: Which cues allow distinguishing statements from questions?
Elisabeth Delais-Roussarie and Giuseppina Turco
136–156
Chapter 8. Compression in French: Effect of length and information status on the prosody of post-verbal sequences
Emilie Destruel Johnson and Caroline Féry
158–176
Chapter 9. Prosody-driven scrambling in Italian
Vieri Samek-Lodovici
178–196
Part III. On the position and realization of subjects in Romance
200–274
Chapter 10. On Romanian preverbal subjects
Ion Giurgea
200–218
Chapter 11. Postverbal subject positions in ‘semi-finite’ clauses in Southern Italo-Romance and Sardinian
Kim A. Groothuis
220–236
Chapter 12. Teasing apart 3rd person null subjects in Brazilian Portuguese
Janayna Carvalho
238–254
Chapter 13. From a Romance null subject grammar to a non-null subject grammar: The syntax of pronominal subjects in advanced and near-native English
Joana Teixeira
256–274
Part IV. Lexical projections and their properties in Romance
278–351
Chapter 14. De-prefixed spatial Ps in medieval French
Thomas M. Rainsford
278–294
Chapter 15. A typology of evaluative nouns
Melania S. Masià
296–312
Chapter 16. Nominal and verbal events in Romance causative constructions: Evidence from Italian
Marta Donazzan
314–331
Chapter 17. Non-verbal predication and clitics in Aromanian
Marios Mavrogiorgos and Adam Ledgeway
334–351
Index
352
Language index
Subject index
Subjects
BIC Subject: CF/2AD – Linguistics/Romance, Italic & Rhaeto-Romanic languages
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2019012343