L3 Syntactic Transfer

Models, new developments and implications

Editors
| University of Salzburg
| Ludwig Maximilians University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027243768 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book Buy from our e-platform
ISBN 9789027265609 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
This book fills an existing gap in the field of third language acquisition (L3A) by bringing together theoretical, empirical, and practical accounts that contribute to informed teaching practices in multilingual classrooms. The volume is organised into three sections that focus on prominent syntactic transfer models in the field of L3A and together provide insights into the interplay of the influences of prior languages in L3 syntax and how we can enrich the practical field of instructed L3 acquisition. Part I includes original papers dealing with new developments of existing theoretical models on syntactic transfer in L3A and Part II consists of empirical studies testing existing models from different perspectives (formal, lexico-functional, and neurocognitive). Following these two sections, Part III discusses how theory can inform practices for L3 learning and teaching. This concise compilation brings to light innovations, not only in terms of theoretical refinements and practical implementations, but also in offering an impressive range of language combinations. This book is intended to act as a unique resource for scholars, applied linguists, language educators, both novices and experts alike, in and beyond the field of L3A.
[Bilingual Processing and Acquisition, 5]  2017.  x, 329 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
ix–x
L3 syntactic transfer – an integrative approach
Tanja Angelovska and Angela Hahn
1–9
Part I. Refining the existing models on L3 syntactic transfer
Chapter 1. Language control in the context of L3 acquisition: The centrality of individual differences
David W. Green
13–34
Chapter 2. Toward a new understanding of syntactic CLI: Evidence from L2 and L3 acquisition
Suzanne Flynn and Éva Berkes
35–61
Chapter 3. Testing the current models of third language acquisition
Roumyana Slabakova and María del Pilar García Mayo
63–84
Chapter 4. The L2 status factor hypothesis revisited: The role of metalinguistic knowledge, working memory, attention and noticing in third language learning
Camilla Bardel and Laura Sanchez
85–101
Chapter 5. Transfer or no transfer; that is the question: The role of the L1 & L2 in L3 acquisition
Karoline Wirbatz and Pascal Buttkewitz
103–124
Part II. New empirical studies on L3 syntactic transfer
Chapter 6. On pronouns that drop (out of German)
Ylva Falk
127–142
Chapter 7. Transfer effects in the acquisition of double object constructions in English as an L3
Ainara Imaz Agirre and María del Pilar García Mayo
143–171
Chapter 8. L3 morphosyntactic effects on L1 vs. L2 systems: The Differential Stability Hypothesis
Jennifer Cabrelli Amaro
173–194
Chapter 9. (When) do L3 English learners transfer from L2 German?: Evidence from spoken and written data by L1 Russian speakers
Tanja Angelovska
195–222
Chapter 10. Transfer from an L2 in third language learning: A study on L2 proficiency
Laura Sanchez and Camilla Bardel
223–250
Part III. Implications for instructed L3 acquisition
Chapter 11. Input Processing and Processing Instruction: Pedagogical and cognitive considerations for L3 acquisition
Alessandro G. Benati and John W. Schwieter
253–275
Chapter 12. From theory to practice in multilingualism: What theoretical research implies for third language learning
Jorge González Alonso and Jason Rothman
277–298
Chapter 13. Input-Practice-Output: A method for teaching L3 English after L2 German with a focus on syntactic transfer
Angela Hahn and Tanja Angelovska
299–319
About the contributors
321–324
Index
325–329
“This collection is a welcome contribution to the dynamically developing field of third language acquisition, offering valuable insights from three complementary perspectives that involve modeling and researching L3 syntactic transfer as well as implementing the findings to the actual teaching practice.”
“The editors compiled an innovate collection of high quality research by most prominent researchers and colleagues in the field. This comprehensive volume provides a welcome addition to the field of L3 acquisition not only because established researchers have joined their forces, but also because it provides insights both in fundamental theoretical issues as well as applications for language teaching. It makes a great contribution both for scholars as well as students interested in language acquisition research. I highly recommend this inspiring collection, which proves to be a masterly treatment of this highly debated and thus challenging topic.”
“This book has two great merits. It examines and integrates different theoretical models of L3 acquisition, and it bridges the gap between research on L3 syntactic transfer and foreign language pedagogy by discussing practical implications of evidence provided in the existing L3 literature for instructed L3 acquisition.”
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFDM – Bilingualism & multilingualism
BISAC Subject: LAN009040 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Psycholinguistics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2017007485