Perception Metaphors

Editors
| University of York and Radboud University
| National Autonomous University of Mexico and Radboud University
| Radboud University
| University of York and Radboud University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027202000 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027263049 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
Metaphor allows us to think and talk about one thing in terms of another, ratcheting up our cognitive and expressive capacity. It gives us concrete terms for abstract phenomena, for example, ideas become things we can grasp or let go of. Perceptual experience—characterised as physical and relatively concrete—should be an ideal source domain in metaphor, and a less likely target. But is this the case across diverse languages? And are some sensory modalities perhaps more concrete than others? This volume presents critical new data on perception metaphors from over 40 languages, including many which are under-studied. Aside from the wealth of data from diverse languages—modern and historical; spoken and signed—a variety of methods (e.g., natural language corpora, experimental) and theoretical approaches are brought together. This collection highlights how perception metaphor can offer both a bedrock of common experience and a source of continuing innovation in human communication.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
Asifa Majid
vii–viii
Chapter 1. Perception metaphors: A view from diversity
Carolyn O'Meara, Laura J. Speed, Lila San Roque and Asifa Majid
1–16
Chapter 2. Words of sense
Constance Classen
17–41
Chapter 3. Perception metaphors in cognitive linguistics: Scope, motivation, and lexicalisation
Iraide Ibarretxe-Antuñano
43–64
Chapter 4. Perception metaphor in English: A bird’s-eye view
Wendy Anderson
65–83
Chapter 5. Metaphors and perception in the lexicon: A diachronic perspective
Francesca Strik Lievers and Irene De Felice
85–104
Chapter 6. Synaesthetic metaphors are neither synaesthetic nor metaphorical
Bodo Winter
105–126
Chapter 7. Sensory experiences, meaning and metaphor: The case of wine
Rosario Caballero
127–143
Chapter 8. Taste metaphors in Hieroglyphic Egyptian
Elisabeth Steinbach-Eicke
145–164
Chapter 9. Why do we understand music as moving?: The metaphorical basis of musical motion revisited
Nina Julich-Warpakowksi
165–184
Chapter 10. Approaching perceptual qualities: The case of heavy
Daria Ryzhova, Ekaterina V. Rakhilina and Liliya Kholkina
185–207
Chapter 11. Grounding mental metaphors in touch: A corpus-based study of English and Polish
Marcin Trojszczak
209–230
Chapter 12. Polysemy of the Estonian perception verb nägema ‘to see’
Mariann Proos
231–252
Chapter 13. Evidential vindication in next turn: Using the retrospective “see?” in conversation
Kobin H. Kendrick
253–274
Chapter 14. Sensory perception metaphors in sign languages
Ulrike Zeshan and Nick Palfreyman
275–301
Chapter 15. Metaphors of perception in Japanese Sign Language
Yufuko Takashima
303–326
Chapter 16. Perception and metaphor: The case of smell
Zoltán Kövecses
327–346
Chapter 17. Perception verbs in context: Perspectives from Kaluli (Bosavi) child-caregiver interaction
Lila San Roque and Bambi B. Schieffelin
347–368
List of metaphors
369–371
Index
373
“For too long, cognitivist (cognitive science) studies has lorded it over sensory studies. This book has the potential to reverse that trend thanks to its close attention to the sensuous.”
Subjects

Psychology

Psychology
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN016000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Semantics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018045420