Spanish Language and Sociolinguistic Analysis

Editors
| University of Texas at Austin
| University of Wisconsin - Madison
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027258076 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027267245 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This book explores the current state of Spanish sociolinguistics and its contribution to theories of language variation and change, from both synchronic and diachronic perspectives. It offers original analyses on a variety of topics across a wide spectrum of linguistic subfields from different formal, experimental, and corpus-based standpoints. The volume is organized around six thematic sections: (i) Cutting-edge Methodologies in Sociolinguistics; (ii) Bilingualism; (iii) Language Acquisition; (iv) Phonological Variation; (v) Morpho-Syntactic Variation; and (vi) Lexical Variation. As a whole, this collection reflects an array of approaches and analyses that show how in its variation across speakers, speech communities, linguistic contexts, communicative situations, dialects, and time, the Spanish language provides an immense wealth of data to challenge accepted linguistic views and shape new theoretical proposals in the field of language variation and change. Spanish Language and Sociolinguistic Analysis represents a significant contribution to the growing field of Spanish sociolinguistics.
[Issues in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics, 8]  2016.  xvi, 406 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
ix–x
Introduction
Sandro Sessarego and Fernando Tejedo-Herrero
xi–xvi
Part I. Cutting-edge Methodologies in Sociolinguistics
Quantitative analysis in language variation and change
Sali A. Tagliamonte
1–32
Combining population genetics (DNA) with historical linguistics: On the African origins of Latin America’s black and mulatto populations
Armin Schwegler
33–88
Part II. Bilingualism
Los Angeles Vernacular Spanish: An analytical approach to its indicators, markers, and stereotypes
Claudia Parodi and Armando Guerrero
89–108
On the tenacity of Andean Spanish: Intra-community recycling
John M. Lipski
109–134
Spanish and Valencian in contact: A study on the linguistic landscape of Elche
Francisco Martínez-Ibarra
135–154
Part III. Language Acquisition
Children’s Spanish subject pronoun expression: A developmental change in ?
Naomi Shin
155–176
The role of social networks in the acquisition of a dialectal features during study abroad
Joshua Pope
177–196
Lexical frequency and subject expression in native and non-native Spanish: A closer look at independent and mediating effects
Bret Linford, Avizia Long, Megan Solon, Melissa Whatley and Kimberly L. Geeslin
197–216
Part IV. Phonological Variation
On glottal stops in Yucatan Spanish: Language contact and dialect standardization
Jim Michnowicz and Laura Kagan
217–240
Vowel raising and social networks in Michoacán: A sociophonetic analysis
Jennifer Barajas
241–260
Bilingualism and aspiration: Coda /s/ reduction on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua
Whitney Chappell
261–282
Part V. Morpho-Syntactic Variation
Spanish and Portuguese parallels: Impoverished number agreement as a vernacular feature of two rural dialects
Sandro Sessarego and Letania Ferreira
283–304
The tuteo of Rocha, Uruguay: Is it as stable as it seems?
Joseph R. Weyers
305–322
A corpus-based sociolinguistic study of contact-induced changes in subject placement in the Spanish of New York City bilinguals
Carolina Barrera Tobón and Rocío Raña-Risso
323–342
Part VI. Lexical Variation
Social factors in semantic change: A corpus-based case study of the verb afeitar ‘to adorn, to apply cosmetics, to shave’
David Korfhagen
343–362
Attitudes towards lexical Arabisms in sixteenth-century Spanish texts
Patricia Giménez-Eguíbar
363–380
“Trabajar es en español, en ladino es lavorar”: Lexical Accommodation in Judeo-Spanish
Rey Romero
381–400
Index
401–406
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2017. Publications Received. Language in Society 46:1  pp. 123 ff. Crossref logo

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Subjects
BIC Subject: CFB – Sociolinguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2016001811