Language, Interaction and Acquisition | Langage, Interaction et Acquisition

LIA is a bilingual English-French journal that publishes original theoretical and empirical research of high scientific quality at the forefront of current debates concerning language acquisition. It covers all facets of language acquisition among different types of learners and in diverse learning situations, with particular attention to oral speech and/or to signed languages. Topics include the acquisition of one or more foreign languages, of one or more first languages, and of sign languages, as well as learners’ use of gestures during speech; the relationship between language and cognition during acquisition; bilingualism and situations of linguistic contact – for example pidginisation and creolisation. The bilingual nature of LIA aims at reaching readership in a wide international community, while simultaneously continuing to attract intellectual and linguistic resources stemming from multiple scientific traditions in Europe, thereby remaining faithful to its original French anchoring. LIA is the direct descendant of the French-speaking journal AILE.
ISSN 1879-7865 | E-ISSN 1879-7873 | Electronic edition
Sample issue: LIA 6:2
Board
Subscription Info
Current issue: 9:1, available as of May 2018

General information about our electronic journals.

Subscription rates

All prices for print + online include postage/handling.

Online-only Print + online
Volume 10 (2019): 2 issues; ca. 300 pp. EUR 166.00 EUR 192.00
Volume 9 (2018): 2 issues; ca. 300 pp. EUR 161.00 EUR 186.00

Individuals may apply for a special subscription rate of EUR 65.00 (online‑only: EUR 60.00)
Private subscriptions are for personal use only, and must be pre-paid and ordered directly from the publisher.

Available back-volumes

Online-only Print + online
Complete backset
(Vols. 1‒8; 2010‒2017)
16 issues;
2,400 pp.
EUR 1,140.00 EUR 1,227.00
Volume 8 (2017) 2 issues; 300 pp. EUR 156.00 EUR 181.00
Volume 7 (2016) 2 issues; 300 pp. EUR 156.00 EUR 176.00
Volume 6 (2015) 2 issues; 300 pp. EUR 156.00 EUR 171.00
Volume 5 (2014) 2 issues; 300 pp. EUR 156.00 EUR 166.00
Volume 4 (2013) 2 issues; 300 pp. EUR 156.00 EUR 161.00
Volumes 1‒3 (2010‒2012) 2 issues; avg. 300 pp. EUR 120.00 each EUR 124.00 each
Subjects

Main BIC Subject

CFDC: Language acquisition

Main BISAC Subject

LAN009000: LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
Issues

Volume 9 (2018)

Volume 8 (2017)

Volume 7 (2016)

Volume 6 (2015)

Volume 5 (2014)

Volume 4 (2013)

Volume 3 (2012)

Volume 2 (2011)

Volume 1 (2010)

Submission

For Language, Interaction and Acquisition John Benjamins offers the possibility of submitting articles online via Editorial Manager .
Editorial Manager is an online submission and review system where authors can submit manuscripts and track their progress.

Before submitting, please consult the guidelines and the Short Guide to EM for Authors .

Guidelines

French version below.

LIA - Guidelines for authors

LIA is a bilingual journal which publishes original theoretical and empirical studies contributing to the study of language acquisition. It covers research on varied types of learners and learning situations, particularly on oral and gestural language. More specifically, it deals with the acquisition of one or more first languages, the acquisition of a second or third language, sign language, and the gesturality accompanying language learners' oral production. The journal also covers the relation between language and cognition in acquisition, bilingualism, language contact such as the processes of pidginisation and creolisation, as well as dysfunction in spoken language. LIA offers a unique venue for the discussion of these topics and their interaction, at the crossroads between linguistics, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics.

Submissions to LIA will only be considered if they address the topics listed above. In particular, studies on language learning in classroom situations will not be reviewed unless they focus directly on the acquisition process itself, rather than only on teaching methods of pedagogical interest.

LIA accepts several types of submissions:

  1. Article: Articles must provide an entirely original theoretical or empirical contribution and be previously unpublished. If they are considered appropriate for the journal, they will undergo a double blind review (anonymous authors and reviewers) by at least two reviewers. Detailed guidelines to authors of articles are provided below (see Instructions for the Submission of Articles, p.2).
  2. Review Article: Review articles are independent articles discussing a published article (in LIA or elsewhere). These are typically invited by LIA editors, but may also be submitted spontaneously without invitation. Like all other articles, if a review article is considered appropriate for the journal, it will undergo a double blind review (anonymous authors and experts) by at least two experts.
  3. Book Review: Book reviews provide a critical review and brief discussion of a recent publication. They are relatively short submissions, typically around three-four pages long (Time New Roman 11, spacing 1.5). They are generally invited by LIA editors, but may also be submitted without invitation. Accepting book reviews is at the discretion of the Chief Editor alone, or in consultation with Associate Editors, depending on the situation, if the submission can be published without recourse to external reviewers.
  4. Proposal of a special issue: Proposals of special issues may be invited or submitted without invitation. Authors wishing to propose an issue must consult the Guidelines for Guest Editors.
  5. Other submissions: Other submissions are possible, but must be discussed directly with the Chief Editor (lia-sflATcnrs.fr).

Instructions for the Submission of Articles

1. Manuscript and text composition

Articles must be written in French or in English and include abstracts in both languages. The language chosen may depend on the Chief Editor (for non-thematic issues) or on the Guest Editor in agreement with the Chief Editor (for special issues). The first and last names of the authors, their institutional affiliations, and their electronic addresses must appear on a front page with the title of the article, but not on the first page in the body of the text. After the front page, the manuscript must contain the following elements in order:

1. the title in the language of the article;
2. the abstract in the language of the article;
3. the body of the text, including tables, if applicable;
4. acknowledgments, if applicable;
5. bibliographic references;
6. the abstract in the other language;
7. figures, if applicable.

Papers must be submitted in an MSword document or equivalent (but not in pdf format), using the font Times New Roman, 11 pt., with line spacing of 1.5 and default margins. The average length in this format is 20 pages (including abstracts, notes, tables, figures, and references), although length may vary depending on the requirements of each issue. The font and the spacing must be identical throughout the article (with the exception of figures, see below). Indentation must be done by tabulation (rather than by the manual insertion of spaces).

Since reviewing will be double blind, authors must ensure that the submitted documents do not reveal their identity (in document properties, self-references if they are too obvious, and so on).

2. Contents of the first page

The first page should begin with the following information:

3. Page layout

Paragraphs start at the beginning of the line without any indentation. Headings and sub-headings within the paper are indicated as follows:

1. First level: skip a line, main numbering, bold;
1.1 Second level: skip a line, secondary numbering, bold;
1.1.1. Third level: skip a line, tertiary numbering, italics (not in bold).

4. Figures and tables

Graphs, illustrations, drawings, and photographs are called Figures. They cannot contain any color. For graphs, use a white background and bars or lines in black, white and different shades of grey, with distinguishing features (such as striped bars or dotted lines) if necessary.

Figures and tables must be numbered consecutively and cited in the paragraph preceding their location (e.g., “As shown in Table 1 ....” or “As shown in Figure 1 ...”). The title must include the number of the figure or table (for example, “Table 1: Percentages of correct responses”). The title is placed under the graph, in bold and centered. If special characters are needed, please provide or indicate the necessary font. If the font is not Unicode, please attach the font (PC). Tables, graphs, drawings, photographs, and other illustrations must be attached to the paper in their original format (xls, eps, tiff, jpeg, pdf) as separate files. The definition for illustrations must be 300 dpi.

In addition, insert all figures and tables at the end of the text and indicate approximately where each should be placed in the body of the text as follows:

----------------------

ATInsert Figure 1

----------------------

5. Notes

Avoid too many notes - do not exceed 15 notes except for special cases. Notes are placed at the bottom of the corresponding page and must be as short as possible. In French, reference to notes is placed before final punctuation and before quotation marks. In English, it follows the final punctuation and quotation marks.

6. Typographical details

Italics are restricted to technical words, foreign words and borrowings (Aktionsart), titles of books and journals in references, and cited words (e.g. “also is used early by children”). Some punctuation marks ( ! ? : ; « ... ») are preceded by a non-segmentable space in French, but not in English. Footnote references precede final punctuation in French, but follow it in English. Double quotation marks (“”) frame citations and single quotation marks (‘’) indicate unusual word use, translations and paraphrases. In English do not use commas after the following abreviations: e.g. (to signify ‘for example’) and i.e. (to signify ‘that is’). With some exceptions (e.g. ages, lists, frequencies in results), numbers under ten and including ten must be written in letters (e.g. “There were two groups of learners, all of whom aged between 20 and 25 years, who had either resided five years in the country (Group 1) or had learned French L2 in classrooms in their country”).

7. Examples

All examples must be numbered in parentheses (1) and cited in the text. Indentation is used if several entries appear for a given example and these entries are differentiated with letters (a, b, c...). A star (*) indicates non-grammatical uses and a question mark (?) dubious uses. Examples from a language other than the language of the article appear in italics and are followed by a translation in the language of the article, which is presented in simple quotation marks and in parentheses. For some languages, it may be necessary to include a literal (morphemic) gloss, as well as a free translation. If necessary, a note should indicate the meaning of some conventions for transcription and for some abbreviations. It is necessary to use automatic tabulations, rather than manually-inserted spaces, to ensure the correct vertical alignment (see an example below). 

French example (5) shows appropriate (5a) and inappropriate (5b) uses. Errors are most frequent with irregular plural nouns in English, as shown in example (6). In German errors mostly concern case markings, while word order is error-free, as in (7). As for Chinese, optional plural markings are rarely used, as shown in (8).

(5)   a.  Les chèvres ont mangé.
       b.  *Chèvres ont mangé.
       (‘[The] goats have eaten.’)

(6)   *Look at my foots!

(7)   Und dann     als die Katze     hochklettert,    sieht sie     *ein Hund.
       And then      as the cat         up.climbs,        sees she     *a[Nom] dog
       (‘And then, as the cat climbs up, it sees a dog.’)

(8)   Ta    pa-shang     qu LE.
       3p    run-ascend   go PRF.
       (‘They ran up.’)

8. Citations

Citations of less than four lines should be integrated in the body of the text and framed by double quotation marks. Final punctuation belonging to the quotation occurs before the closing quotation mark in French and after it in English. Quotations of more than four lines are detached from the text as a separate paragraph with all of its lines indented with tabulation and without any quotation marks.

9. Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments to colleagues or institutions may be indicated in the language of the article at the end of the text and before the bibliographic references, on a new line beginning with the following heading in bold: Acknowledgments (if the article is in English) or Remerciements (if the article is in French). The text of the acknowledgments then starts on a new line.

10. Bibliographic references
10.1 General guidelines

The same format is used for publications in French and in English, except for spaces that are necessary with some French punctuation marks in titles (see Section 6 above). All bibliographic references cited in the text must appear in a list at the end of the paper under the heading REFERENCES (in bold). Equally, all references appearing in this list must be cited in the text. The list of references should be alphabetical in order; similarly, references listed together in the text should appear in alphabetical order. If more than one publication is cited for a given author, list references in chronological order from least recent to most recent and use the notation ‘a, b, c’ in parentheses after the publication year if more than one reference were published within the same year. Use a colon if a page number is cited.

10.2 References cited in the text

If a cited reference contains more than one author: a) when citing this reference in parentheses, use the sign ‘&’ without any comma before the last author; b) if the reference is cited outside of parentheses, use ‘and’ without any comma before the last author. If a reference contains more than two authors, mention all authors when first citing the reference, but on subsequent mentions use the name of the first author followed by ‘et al.’ . Use a colon after the date without spaces to indicate page numbers.

Examples:

10.3 List of references at the end of the paper

For a given reference, all lines after the first line must be indented. It is necessary to use automatic indentation in order to ensure the correct vertical alignment. References must contain the following information:

Examples:

Berman, R. & Slobin, D.I. (eds.) (1994). Different ways of relating events in narrative: acrosslinguistic developmental study. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum.

Klein, W. (1994). Time in language. London: Routledge.

Papafragou, A., Massey, C. & Gleitman, L. (2002). Shake, rattle, ‘n’ roll: The representation of motion in language and cognition. Cognition 84, 189-219.

Slobin, D.I. (1996a). From ‘thought and language’ to ‘thinking for speaking.’ In J.J.Gumperz & S.C. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity (70-96).Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Slobin, D.I. (1996b). Two ways to travel: verbs of motion in English and Spanish. In M. Shibatani & S.A. Thompson (eds.), Grammatical constructions: Their form and meaning (195-220). Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Stutterheim, C. &  Klein, W. (1989). Text structure and referential movement. In R. Dietrich & C.F. Graumann (eds.), Language processing in social context (39-67). Amsterdam: North-Holland.

Vasseur, M.-T. & Arditty, J. (1996). Les activités réflexives en situation de communication exolingue. Acquisition et Interaction en Langue Étrangère 8, 57-87.

11. Editorial modifications in the manuscripts

Some stylistic modifications may be directly introduced by the editorial board, without consulting the author, if publication deadlines do not permit further exchanges.

 

____________________________________________________________________________

 

MODEL – ARTICLE IN ENGLISH

 

This is the title of an article in English:

this is the sub-title of the article (if applicable)

 

Abstract

This is the abstract in the language of the article (opening abstract in English for an article in English).
This is the abstract in the language of the article (opening abstract in English for an article in English).

Key words: key word 1, key word 2, key word 3, ...

1. Title - first level

This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph.

1.1 Title - second level

This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph.

1.1.1. Title - third level

This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph. This is a normal paragraph.

Acknowledgments

This is an acknowledgment.This is an acknowledgment. This is an acknowledgment. This is an acknowledgment.

[page break] REFERENCES

Berman, R. & Slobin, D.I. (eds.) (1994). Different ways of relating events in narrative: acrosslinguistic developmental study. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum.

Klein, W. (1994). Time in language. London: Routledge.

Papafragou, A., Massey, C. & Gleitman, L. (2002). Shake, rattle, ‘n’ roll: The representation of motion in language and cognition. Cognition 84, 189-219.

Slobin, D.I. (1996a). From ‘thought and language’ to ‘thinking for speaking.’ In J.J.Gumperz & S.C. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity (70-96).Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Slobin, D.I. (1996b). Two ways to travel: verbs of motion in English and Spanish. In M. Shibatani & S.A. Thompson (eds.), Grammatical constructions: Their form and meaning (195-220). Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Stutterheim, C. &  Klein, W. (1989). Text structure and referential movement. In R. Dietrich & C.F. Graumann (eds.), Language processing in social context (39-67). Amsterdam: North-Holland.

Vasseur, M.-T. & Arditty, J. (1996). Les activités réflexives en situation de communication exolingue. Acquisition et Interaction en Langue Étrangère 8, 57-87.

Résumé

Ceci est le résumé dans l’autre langue (résumé de fin en français pour un article en anglais). Ceci est le résumé dans l’autre langue (résumé de fin en français pour un article en anglais). Ceci est le résumé dans l’autre langue (résumé de fin en français pour un article en anglais). Ceci est le résumé dans l’autre langue (résumé de fin en français pour un article en anglais).

 

_______________________________________________________________________

 

LIA - Recommandations aux auteurs

La revue bilingue français/anglais LIA publie des travaux originaux, théoriques et empiriques contribuant aux débats sur l’acquisition du langage. Elle réunit des recherches portant sur différents types d’apprenants et de situations d’apprentissage, et tout particulièrement sur la langue orale et gestuelle. Plus précisément, elle traite de l’acquisition d’une deuxième ou troisième langue, d’une ou plusieurs langues maternelles, de la langue des signes, ou encore de la gestuelle des apprenants en liaison avec leur production verbale. Elle aborde aussi les problématiques de la relation entre langue et cognition dans l’acquisition, du bilinguisme, des situations de contact linguistique, par exemple les processus de pidginisation et de créolisation – ainsi que les dysfonctionnements de la langue orale. LIA offre ainsi un espace unique pour aborder ces différentes thématiques et leurs croisements, à l’interface entre plusieurs champs disciplinaires : linguistique, psycholinguistique, sociolinguistique.

Toute soumission à LIA ne sera prise en compte que si elle traite des thèmes ci-dessus. En particulier, les études portant sur des situations d’apprentissage en salle de classe ne seront évaluées que si elles traitent directement du processus d’acquisition en lui-même, et non exclusivement des méthodes d’enseignement relevant du champ de la didactique.

LIA accepte plusieurs types de soumissions :

  1. Article : Les articles doivent proposer une contribution théorique et/ou empirique entièrement originale et non publiée dans un autre support de publication. S’ils sont considérés comme appropriés pour la revue, ils seront évalués par (au moins) deux experts en double aveugle (auteurs anonymes, experts anonymes). Des consignes détaillées destinées aux auteurs d’articles sont fournies ci-dessous (voir « Recommandations pour les soumissions d’articles » p. 11).
  2. Critique d’article : Les critiques d’article constituent des articles en soi dont l’objet est de discuter un article publié (dans LIA ou dans un autre support de publication). Elles sont normalement invitées par LIA, mais peuvent également constituer une soumission spontanée. Comme tout article, si une critique d’article est considérée comme appropriée pour la revue, elle sera évaluée par au moins deux experts en double aveugle (auteurs anonymes, experts anonymes).
  3. Critique de livre : Les critiques de livres proposent un compte-rendu et une brève discussion d’une publication récente. Il s’agit de soumissions plus courtes, généralement d’environ trois-quatre pages (Times New Roman 11, interligne 1,5), qui sont normalement invitées par LIA, mais qui peuvent également être proposées spontanément. Selon le cas, l’Editeur en Chef décide seul ou en concertation avec les Editeurs Associés si la soumission peut être publiée sans recours à des experts extérieurs.
  4. Proposition de numéro thématique: Les propositions de numéros thématiques peuvent êtres soit invitées, soit soumises spontanément. Afin de soumettre ce type de proposition, il est nécessaire de consulter les consignes pour coordinateurs de numéros thématiques.
  5. Autres soumissions : D’autres soumissions sont possibles mais doivent faire l’objet d’un courrier adressé à l’Editeur en chef de la revue : lia-sflATcnrs.fr

Recommandations pour les soumissions d’articles

1. Manuscrit et composition du texte

Les articles doivent être rédigés soit en français, soit en anglais, et accompagnés de résumés dans les deux langues. Le choix de la langue est laissé à la discrétion de l’Editeur-en-Chef (pour les numéros non thématiques) et des coordinateurs de chaque numéro, en concertation avec les responsables de la revue (pour les numéros thématiques).  Les noms et prénoms des auteurs, leurs affiliations institutionnelles et leurs adresses électroniques doivent figurer sur une page de garde séparée avec le titre de l’article, et non sur la première page de l’article. Après la page de garde, le manuscrit doit comprendre dans l'ordre :

1. le titre dans la langue de l'article ;
2. le résumé dans la langue de l’article ;
3. le texte principal, comprenant des tableaux éventuels ;
4. des remerciements éventuels ;
5. les références bibliographiques ;
6. le résumé dans l’autre langue ;
7. les figures éventuelles.

Les textes doivent être soumis dans un document MSword ou équivalent (mais pas en pdf) en police Times New Roman de taille 11 en interligne 1,5 et avec des marges standard. La longueur des soumissions dans ce format est de 20 pages en moyenne (comprenant les résumés, notes, tableaux, figures et références bibliographiques), mais la longueur peut varier selon les exigences de chaque numéro. La police et l'interligne doivent être identiques d'un bout à l'autre de l'article (à l’exception des figures, voir ci-après). Les retraits doivent se faire par tabulation (et non par l’insertion d’espaces manuellement).

L’évaluation des soumissions étant effectuée en double aveugle, les auteurs doivent s’assurer que qu’aucun document ne révèle leur identité (dans les sources des documents, les autocitations si elles sont trop évidentes, etc.).

2. Contenu de la première page

La première page commence par les informations suivantes :

3. Mise en page

Les paragraphes commencent en début de ligne sans retrait. Les niveaux de titres et de sous-titres dans le corps de l’article sont indiqués de la façon suivante :

1. Premier niveau : saut de ligne, numérotation principale, caractères gras ;
1.1. Deuxième niveau : saut de ligne, numérotation secondaire, caractères gras ;
1.1.1. Troisième niveau : saut de ligne, numérotation tertiaire, italiques (sans gras).

4. Figures et tableaux

Les graphiques, illustrations, schémas et photos sont appelés « Figures ». Celles-ci ne peuvent pas être en couleurs. Pour les graphiques, utiliser un fond blanc et des barres ou des lignes en noir, blanc et dégradés de gris, éventuellement avec des motifs (du type barres hachurées ou lignes en pointillés).
Les tableaux et les figures doivent être numérotés de façon consécutive et cités dans le paragraphe précédant leur emplacement dans le corps du texte (par exemple, « Comme le montre le Tableau 1…. » ou « Comme le montre la Figure 1…. »). Le titre doit inclure le numéro de la figure ou du tableau (par exemple, « Tableau 1 : Pourcentages de réponses correctes »). Le titre se trouve en bas, en gras et est centré. Indiquer/fournir la police nécessaire en cas de caractères spéciaux. S’il ne s’agit pas d’une police Unicode, joindre la police (PC). Les tableaux, graphiques, schémas, photos, et autres illustrations doivent être attachés à l’article dans des fichiers séparés et dans leur format original (document natif : .xls, eps, jpeg, tiff, pdf). Pour les illustrations, la définition doit être de 300 dpi.
Insérer tous les tableaux et figures à la fin du texte et indiquer l’emplacement approximatif prévu pour chacune d’entre elles dans le texte de la façon suivante :

----------------------

ATInsérer Figure 1

----------------------

5. Notes

Eviter de multiplier les notes - sauf exception, ne pas dépasser une quinzaine de notes. Les notes sont placées en bas de page et sont aussi courtes que possible. En français, l'appel de note précède la ponctuation finale et les guillemets. En anglais, il suit la ponctuation finale et les guillemets.

6. Détails typographiques

Les italiques sont réservés aux mots techniques, aux mots étrangers ou d'emprunt (Aktionsart), aux titres d'ouvrages et de revues dans les références et aux mots en mention (par exemple, « aussi est  utilisé de façon précoce par les enfants »). Certaines marques de ponctuation ( ! ? : ; « ... ») sont précédées d'un espace insécable en français, non en anglais. . La ponctuation finale suit l’appel de note en français, mais le précède en anglais. Les « guillemets bas doubles » encadrent les citations. Les 'guillemets hauts simples' sans espaces sont utilisés pour les mots détournés de leur emploi habituel, ainsi que pour les traductions et les paraphrases. En anglais, ne pas utiliser de virgule après les abréviations suivantes : e.g. (pour signifier ‘par exemple’) and i.e. (pour signifier ‘c’est-à-dire’). A l’exception de certain cas particuliers (âges, listes, fréquences dans les résultats), les chiffres en-dessous de dix et incluant dix doivent être écrits en lettres (par exemple, « L’étude comprend deux groupes d’apprenants, tous âgés entre 20 et 25 ans, qui avaient soit résidé dans le pays (Group 1), soit appris le français L2 en classe dans leur pays (Groupe 2) ».

7. Exemples

Tous les exemples doivent être numérotés par un numéro entre parenthèses et cités dans le texte. Un retrait est utilisé si plusieurs entrées apparaissent pour un exemple donné et celles-ci sont différenciées par des lettres (a, b, c...). L’étoile (*) indique les emplois agrammaticaux et le point d’interrogation (?) ceux qui sont douteux. Les exemples provenant d’une langue autre que celle de l’article apparaissent en italiques et sont suivis d’une traduction dans la langue de l’article entre guillemets simples et entre parenthèses. Pour certaines langues, il peut être nécessaire d’inclure une traduction littérale (morphémique) et une autre traduction libre. Si nécessaire, une note indiquera le sens de certaines conventions de transcription ou abréviations. Il est impératif d’utiliser des retraits automatiques et des tabulations, et non des espaces insérés manuellement, pour assurer un alignement vertical correct (voir l’exemple dans l’encadré ci-après).

L’exemple (5) montre des emplois approprié (5a) et inapproprié (5b) en français. Les erreurs sont les plus fréquentes avec les pluriels irréguliers en anglais, par exemple (6). En allemand, la plupart des erreurs concernent les marques casuelles, mais pas l’ordre des mots, par exemple (7). Quant au chinois, les marques optionnelles du pluriel sont rarement utilisées (8).

(5)   a.  Les chèvres ont mangé.
       b.  *Chèvres ont mangé.

(6)   *Look at my foots!
       (‘Regarde mes pieds !’)

(7)   Und dann             als            die Katze hochklettert, sieht         sie        *ein Hund.
       Et puis        quand le chat       haut.grimpe, voit                        elle         *un[Nom] chien
       (‘Et puis, alors que le chat grimpe, il voit un chien.’)

(8)   Ta   pa-shang      qu LE.
       3p   run-ascend   go PRF.
       (‘Ils sont montés en courant’.)

8. Citations

Les citations de moins de quatre lignes sont intégrées au corps du texte et encadrées par des guillemets doubles. La ponctuation finale appartenant à la citation intervient avant les guillemets fermants en français et après en anglais. Les citations de plus de quatre lignes sont détachées du texte comme un paragraphe séparé dont toutes les lignes sont en retrait et sans guillemets.

9. Remerciements

Des remerciements destinés à des collègues ou à des institutions peuvent être indiqués dans la langue de l'article à la fin du texte principal et avant les références bibliographiques sur une ligne commençant par le titre suivant en gras : Remerciements (si l’article est en français) ou Acknowledgments (si l’article est en anglais). Le texte des remerciements commence ensuite sur une nouvelle ligne.

10. Références bibliographiques
10.1 Consignes générales

Les mêmes consignes sont utilisées pour les publications en français et en anglais, à l’exception des espaces nécessaires avec certaines marques de ponctuation pour les titres en français (voir section 6 ci-dessus). Toutes les références bibliographiques citées dans le texte doivent apparaître dans une liste en fin de texte intitulée REFERENCES (titre en gras). Inversement, toutes les références apparaissant dans cette liste doivent être citées dans le texte. Les références apparaissent par ordre alphabétique lorsqu’elles sont citées dans le texte ainsi que dans la liste en fin de texte. Si plus d’une référence est citée pour un auteur donné, utiliser l’ordre chronologique (de l’année la plus récente à la plus ancienne), ainsi que la notation « a, b, c » après la date de publication dans les parenthèses si plus d’une référence citée a été publiée la même année.

10.2 Références citées dans le texte

Lorsqu’une référence citée entre parenthèses contient plus d’un auteur : utiliser le signe « & » sans virgule avant le deuxième ou le dernier auteur, si la référence est citée entre parenthèses ; utiliser « et » sans virgule avant le deuxième ou le dernier auteur si la référence est citée hors parenthèses. Si une référence contient plus de deux auteurs, mentionner tous les auteurs lorsque la référence est citée pour la première fois, mais utiliser « et al. » (sans italiques) après le nom du premier auteur lors des mentions ultérieures.

Exemples :

10.2 Liste des références en fin de texte

Pour une référence donnée, toutes les lignes après la première ligne sont en retarit. Il est nécessaire d’utiliser des retraits automatiques pour assurer un alignement vertical correct. Les références doivent contenir les informations suivantes :

Exemples :

Berman, R. & Slobin, D.I. (eds.) (1994). Different ways of relating events in narrative: acrosslinguistic developmental study. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum.

Klein, W. (1994). Time in language. London: Routledge.

Papafragou, A., Massey, C. & Gleitman, L. (2002). Shake, rattle, ‘n’ roll: The representation of motion in language and cognition. Cognition 84, 189-219.

Slobin, D.I. (1996a). From ‘thought and language’ to ‘thinking for speaking.’ In J.J.Gumperz & S.C. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity (70-96).Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Slobin, D.I. (1996b). Two ways to travel: verbs of motion in English and Spanish. In M. Shibatani & S.A. Thompson (eds.), Grammatical constructions: Their form and meaning (195-220). Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Stutterheim, C. &  Klein, W. (1989). Text structure and referential movement. In R. Dietrich & C.F. Graumann (eds.), Language processing in social context (39-67). Amsterdam: North-Holland.

Vasseur, M.-T. & Arditty, J. (1996). Les activités réflexives en situation de communication exolingue. Acquisition et Interaction en Langue Étrangère 8, 57-87.

11. Modifications éditoriales des manuscrits

Des modifications portant sur le style pourront être introduites directement par le comité de rédaction sans consulter l'auteur si les impératifs de parution n’en laissent pas le temps.

 

____________________________________________________________________________

 

MODELE – ARTICLE EN FRANCAIS

 

Ceci est le titre d’un article en français:

ceci est le sous-titre de l’article (le cas échéant)

 

Résumé

Ceci est le résumé dans la langue de l’article (résumé de début en français pour un article en français). Ceci est le résumé dans la langue de l’article (résumé de début en français pour un article en français).

Mot clefs : mot clef 1, mot clef 2, mot clef 3 ...

1. Titre - premier niveau

Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal.

1.1 Titre - deuxième niveau

Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal.

1.1.1. Titre - troisième niveau

Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal. Ceci est un paragraphe normal.

Remerciements 

Ceci est un remerciement. Ceci est un remerciement. Ceci est un remerciement. Ceci est un remerciement. Ceci est un remerciement.

[saut de page] REFERENCES

Berman, R. & Slobin, D.I. (eds.) (1994). Different ways of relating events in narrative: acrosslinguistic developmental study. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum.

Klein, W. (1994). Time in language. London: Routledge.

Papafragou, A., Massey, C. & Gleitman, L. (2002). Shake, rattle, ‘n’ roll: The representation of motion in language and cognition. Cognition 84, 189-219.

Slobin, D.I. (1996a). From ‘thought and language’ to ‘thinking for speaking.’ In J.J.Gumperz & S.C. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity (70-96).Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Slobin, D.I. (1996b). Two ways to travel: verbs of motion in English and Spanish. In M. Shibatani & S.A. Thompson (eds.), Grammatical constructions: Their form and meaning (195-220). Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Stutterheim, C. &  Klein, W. (1989). Text structure and referential movement. In R. Dietrich & C.F. Graumann (eds.), Language processing in social context, 39-67. Amsterdam: North-Holland.

Vasseur, M.-T. & Arditty, J. (1996). Les activités réflexives en situation de communication exolingue. Acquisition et Interaction en Langue Étrangère 8, 57-87.

Abstract

This is the abstract in the other language (final abstract in English for an article in French). This is the abstract in the other language (final abstract in English for an article in French). This is the abstract in the other language (final abstract in English for an article in French). This is the abstract in the other language (final abstract in English for an article in French).