Interconnecting Translation Studies and Imagology

Editors
| KU Leuven & Stellenbosch University
| KU Leuven
| University of Amsterdam
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027258601 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027267719 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
Isn’t translation all about saying exactly the same thing in another language? Aren’t national images totally outdated in this era of globalization? Most people might agree but this book amply illustrates how persistent and multifaceted clichés on translation and nation can be. Time and again, translating involves making transfer choices and these choices are never neutral. Though globalization has seemingly all but erased national ideologies and cultural borders, such ideologies and borders continue to play a determining role in conflicts, identity politics and cultural profiles.

The place where transfer choices and forms of national and cultural representation come together is also the place where Translation Studies and Imagology meet. This book offers a wealth of chapters showing how decisive selection and transfer processes can be in representing national images, both self-images and images of the other(s). It shows also how intensely the two disciplines can work together and mutually benefit from shared data and methodologies.
[Benjamins Translation Library, 119]  2016.  vii, 333 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
On translated images, stereotypes and disciplines
Peter Flynn, Joep Leerssen and Luc van Doorslaer
1–18
Translation and historical trajectories of images
Translating identity: The Debate Betwene the Heraldes, John Coke’s 1549 Translation of the Débat des herauts d’armes
Simon Mckinnon
21–35
The adventures of a Amsterdam Spaniard: Nation-building in a 17th-century Dutch pseudotranslation
Yolanda Rodríguez Pérez
37–52
National images in transit: Historical fiction and its translation in an age of competing nationalisms
Raphaël Ingelbien
53–67
The image of Spain in Flanders as shaped by the translations of Jozef Simons
Lieve Behiels
69–83
Translation and the construction of hetero-Images
Englishness in German translations of Alice in Wonderland
Emer O’ Sullivan
87–107
Champion of the humiliated and insulted or xenophobic satirist?: Dostoevsky’s Mockery of Germans in early translation
Pieter Boulogne
109–125
Italians in films: Opposing and negotiating hetero-constructed images of Italianness
Carla Mereu Keating
127–142
Translation and the reconstruction of hetero-images
Comparing national images in translations of popular fiction
Marija Zlatnar Moe and Tanja Žigon
145–161
Bel Paese or Spaghetti noir?: The image of Italy in contemporary Italian fiction translated into Danish
Hanne Jansen
163–179
How Algeria’s multilingual condition and colonial history is obscured: Marketing three postcolonial Francophone Algerian writers in Dutch translation
Désirée Schyns
181–200
Translation as blockage, propagation and recreation of ethnic images
Rodica Dimitriu
201–215
Translation and auto-images
The construction of national images through news translation: Self-framing in El País English Edition
Roberto A. Valdeón
219–237
Images of turmoil. Italy portrayed in Britain and re-mirrored in Italy
Maria Cristina Caimotto
239–256
Images of Italy?: The words Berlusconi never (officially) said
Denise Filmer
257–275
(Trans)forming national images in translation: The case of the “Young Estonia” movement
Daniele Monticelli
277–297
Nation in translation: The South Slavic mythomoteurs in the early modern period
Zrinka Blažević
299–313
Envoi
Sundry remarks about a discipline in the making by an eye-witness
Raymond Van den Broeck
317–323
Name index
325–328
Subject index
329–333
“This book offers a meaningful starting point for looking into the cross-section of imagology and translation.”
“This collection embraces a couple of key tensions. It seeks the new critical possibilities that attend work at a new nexus, but also makes room for readers either focused on the dynamics of translation or drawn to the (de)construction of national character and its images.”
“Readers will come across a detailed picture of interactions that permeate lives and societies far more than previously realized.”
“The three editors were successful in compiling a coherent and very interesting volume with contributions highlighting various interconnections between TS and imagology based on very different national images. [...] The volume convincingly illustrates that the construct of the nation needs to be taken on board in TS as a complementary frame to the transcultural frame of our globalised world.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Baer, Brian James & Nike K. Pokorn
2018. Diaspora as a Distinct Site of Translational Activity: The Case of U.S. Immigrant Newspapers, 1917-1941. TTR : traduction, terminologie, rédaction 31:2  pp. 141 ff. Crossref logo
Filmer, Denise
2019. Voicing diversity? Negotiating Italian identity through voice-over translation in BBC broadcasting. Perspectives 27:2  pp. 299 ff. Crossref logo
Gentile, Paola
2020. Religious Images of the Netherlands in Italy: An Analysis of Press Articles and Novel Translations. Dutch Crossing 44:1  pp. 81 ff. Crossref logo
Gentile, Paola & Luc van Doorslaer
2019. Translating the North–South imagological feature in a movie: Bienvenue chez les Ch’tis and its Italian versions. Perspectives 27:6  pp. 797 ff. Crossref logo
LI, Wenjie
2017. The Complexity of Indirect Translation. Orbis Litterarum 72:3  pp. 181 ff. Crossref logo
Li, Wenjie
2018.  In Key Cultural Texts in Translation [Benjamins Translation Library, 140],  pp. 153 ff. Crossref logo
Pięta, Hanna
2018. Friend and foe. Target 30:3  pp. 345 ff. Crossref logo
Valdeón, Roberto A.
2018.  In Reception Studies and Audiovisual Translation [Benjamins Translation Library, 141],  pp. 111 ff. Crossref logo
van Doorslaer, Luc
2019. Embedding imagology in Translation Studies. Slovo.ru: Baltic accent 10:3  pp. 56 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 10 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2015030403