Transfiction

Research into the realities of translation fiction

Editors
| University of Vienna
| University of Vienna
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027258502 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027270733 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This volume on Transfiction (understood as an aestheticized imagination of translatorial action) recognizes the power of fiction as a vital and pulsating academic resource, and in doing so helps expand the breadth and depth of TS. The book covers a selection of peer-reviewed papers from the 1st International Conference on Fictional Translators and Interpreters in Literature and Film (held at the University of Vienna, Austria in 2011) and links literary and cinematic works of translation fiction to state-of-the-art translation theory and practice. It presents not just a mixed bag of cutting-edge views and perspectives, but great care has been taken to turn it into a well-rounded transficcionario with a fluid dialogue among its 22 chapters. Its investigation of translatorial action in the mirror of fiction (i.e. beyond the cognitive barrier of ‘fact’) and its multiple transdisciplinary trajectories make for thought-provoking readings in TS, comparative literature, as well as foreign language and literature courses.
[Benjamins Translation Library, 110]  2014.  ix, 373 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Going fictional! Translators and interpreters in literature and film: An introduction
Klaus Kaindl
1–26
A Hitchhiker’s Guide to …: What to expect and where to start from
Karlheinz Spitzl
27–34
Episode I. Entering theoretical territories
The power of fiction as theory: Some exemplary lessons on translation from Borges’s stories
Rosemary Arrojo
37–50
Language, essence, and silence: Fictional Translators in Peter Kosminsky’s The Promise
Salam Al-Mahadin
51–68
Walter Benjamin revisited: A literary reading in Todd Hasak-Lowy’s short story “The Task of this Translator”
Fotini Apostolou
69–86
Of dragons and translators: Foreignness as a principle of life: Yoko Tawada’s “St. George and the Translator”
Klaus Kaindl
87–102
Taking care of the stars: Interpreted interaction in Amadou Hampâté Bâ’s L’étrange destin de Wangrin
Karlheinz Spitzl
103–112
Reaching a dead-end – and then?: Jacques Gélats Le Traducteur and Le Traducteur Amoureux
Nitsa Ben-Ari
113–124
Episode II. Travelling through sociocultural space
From La dolce vita to La vita agra : The image of the Italian literary translator as an illusory, rebellious and precarious intellectual
Giovanni Nadiani
127–140
From a faltering bystander to a spiritual leader: Re-thinking the role of translators in Russia
Natalia Olshanskaya
141–156
Interpreting Daniel Stein : Or what happens when fictional translators get translated
Brian James Baer
157–176
Fictional translators in Québec novels
Patricia Godbout
177–188
Pseudotranslations in 18th century France
Sigrid Kupsch-Losereit
189–202
Episode III. Experiencing agency and action
On the (in)fidelity of (fictional) interpreters
Ingrid Kurz
205–220
Interpreting conflict: Memories of an interpreter
Marija Todorova
221–232
Truth in translation: Interpreters’ subjectivity in the Truth and Reconciliation Hearings in South Africa
Alice Leal
233–246
Wittnessing, remembering, translating: Translation and translator figures in Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated and Anne Michael’s Fugitive Pieces
Sabine Strümper-Krobb
247–260
Translating the past, negotiating the self: Discursive resistance in Elisabeth Reichart’s Komm über den See
Renate Resch
261–270
The apocalyptical interpreter and the end of Europe: Alain Fleischer’s Prolongations
Dörte Andres
271–284
Episode IV. Carrying function into effect
Willa Muir: The “factional translator”. How Muir self-fictionalized her translations of Kafka’s work
Michelle Woods
287–298
Translation as a source of humor: Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated/Alles ist erleuchtet
Waltraud Kolb
299–314
Neither is a translator, unless they’re transauthers: Confusion and (re-)gendering in feminist fiction/translation
Daniela Beuren
315–328
Magical mediation: Translation/interpreting and gender in the narrative world of Harry Potter
Alice Casarini
329–344
Future imperfect: Translation and translators in science-fiction novels
Monika Wozniak
345–362
Fiction as a catalyst: Some afterthoughts
Karlheinz Spitzl
363–368
Name index
369–370
Subject index
371–373
“Because of the coherence of its chapters, which do indeed take the reader on a journey, and for the fascinating picture of translation—in fiction and in practice—that emerges from its pages, this volume is a remarkable contribution to contemporary translation studies and succeeds in opening a new area of study where fiction and translation intersect.”
Transfiction is edited with a passion and close understanding of the issues involved, as well as the possibilities beyond; it will not be the final word in a growing field of study, but we may already count it among the key publications on the manifold ways in which, as Patricia Godbout puts it somewhere in the second ‘episode’ of this volume, the reader’s attention now shifts ‘from the translator as character to translation itself as a fictional motif’ (p. 186). It is a fine recent addition to John Benjamins' ever-reliable Translation Library (BTL), and one that should be consulted by Translation Studies scholars, by translators of literature and, not least, by creative writers: the book is a host of novel ideas (pun intended).”
“The editors of Transfiction are to be commended for providing a vehicle for critical observations on the works of such canonical writers as Cervantes, Borges, Voltaire, Conan Doyle, and Kafka, as well as on the fiction produced by professional translators and interpreters who reflect on the problems, limitations, and possibilities of their craft. This fine anthology deals with a phenomenon in literature and film that has important implications for Translation Studies.”
“This volume appears to exhaust all possible inroads into research on transfiction; its varied and comprehensive array of papers makes it a true contribution to this field, and it will no doubt be recognised as a key text well into the future.”
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 13 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Literature & Literary Studies

Theoretical literature & literary studies

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Interpreting
Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2013042483 | Marc record