Handbook of Translation Studies

Volume 1

Editors
| University of Turku
| Lessius University College, Antwerp; CETRA, University of Leuven
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027203311 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027273765 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 

As a meaningful manifestation of how institutionalized the discipline has become, the new Handbook of Translation Studies is most welcome. It joins the other signs of maturation such as Summer Schools, the development of academic curricula, historical surveys, journals, book series, textbooks, terminologies, bibliographies and encyclopedias.

The HTS aims at disseminating knowledge about translation and interpreting and providing easy access to a large range of topics, traditions, and methods to a relatively broad audience: not only students who often adamantly prefer such user-friendliness, researchers and lecturers in Translation Studies, Translation & Interpreting professionals; but also scholars and experts from other disciplines (among which linguistics, sociology, history, psychology). In addition the HTS addresses any of those with a professional or personal interest in the problems of translation, interpreting, localization, editing, etc., such as communication specialists, journalists, literary critics, editors, public servants, business managers, (intercultural) organization specialists, media specialists, marketing professionals.

The usability, accessibility and flexibility of the HTS depend on the commitment of people who agree that Translation Studies does matter. All users are therefore invited to share their feedback. Any questions, remarks and suggestions for improvement can be sent to the editorial team at hts at kuleuven.be.

Next to the book edition (in printed and electronic, PDF, format), HTS is also available as an online resource, connected with the Translation Studies Bibliography. For access to the Handbook of Translation Studies Online, please visit http://www.benjamins.com/online/hts/ .

[Handbook of Translation Studies, 1]  2010.  x, 468 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
1–2
Adaptation
John Milton
3–6
Applied Translation Studies
Rosa Rabadán
7–11
Audiovisual translation
Aline Remael
12–17
Censorship
Denise Merkle
18–21
Children's literature and translation
Cecilia Alvstad
22–27
Cognitive approaches
Fabio Alves and Amparo Hurtado Albir
28–35
Comics in translation
Klaus Kaindl
36–40
Commercial translation
Maeve Olohan
41–44
Committed approaches and activism
Siobhan Brownlie
45–48
Community interpreting
Erik Hertog
49–54
Competence
Amparo Hurtado Albir
55–59
Computer-aided translation
Lynne Bowker and Desmond Fisher
60–65
Conference interpreting
Robin Setton
66–74
Consecutive interpreting
Helle V. Dam
75–79
Corpora
Sara Laviosa
80–86
Curriculum
Dorothy Kelly
87–93
Descriptive Translation Studies (DTS)
Alexandra Assis Rosa
94–104
Drama translation
Sirkku Aaltonen
105–110
Ethics and translation
Ben Van Wyke
111–115
Ethnographic approaches
Peter Flynn
116–119
Functionalist approaches
Christiane Nord
120–128
Gender in translation
Luise von Flotow
129–133
Globalization and translation
Michael Cronin
134–140
Hermeneutics and translation
Radegundis Stolze
141–146
Humor in translation
Jeroen Vandaele
147–152
Interpreting
Franz Pöchhacker
153–157
Interpreting Studies
Franz Pöchhacker
158–172
Interpretive approach
Marianne Lederer
173–179
Journalism and translation
Luc van Doorslaer
180–184
Language learning and translation
Kirsten Malmkjær
185–190
Legal translation
Deborah Cao
191–195
Literary Studies and Translation Studies
Dirk Delabastita
196–208
Localization and translation
Reinhard Schäler
209–214
Machine translation today
Mikel L. Forcada
215–223
Media interpreting
Franz Pöchhacker
224–226
Multilingualism and translation
Reine Meylaerts
227–230
Networking and volunteer translators
Deborah A. Folaron
231–234
Norms of translation
Christina Schäffner
235–244
Overt and covert translation
Juliane House
245–246
Philosophy and translation
Rosemary Arrojo
247–251
Political translation
Chantal Gagnon
252–256
Polysystem theory and translation
Nam Fung Chang
257–263
Post-colonial literatures and translation
Paul Bandia
264–269
Quality in translation
Daniel Gouadec
270–275
Relay interpreting
Miriam Shlesinger †
276–278
Relevance and translation
Fabio Alves and José Luiz Gonçalves
279–284
Religious translation
Jacobus A. Naudé
285–293
Retranslation
Kaisa Koskinen and Outi Paloposki
294–298
Scientific translation
Scott L. Montgomery
299–305
Self-translation
Chiara Montini
306–308
Semantic models and translation
Paul Kussmaul
309–313
Semiotics and translation
Ubaldo Stecconi
314–319
Sight translation
Ivana Čeňková
320–323
Sign language interpreting and translating
Lorraine Leeson and Myriam Vermeerbergen
324–328
Simultaneous conference interpreting and technology
Ebru Diriker
329–332
Simultaneous interpreting
Mariachiara Russo
333–336
Sociology of translation
Michaela Wolf
337–343
Subtitling
Jorge Díaz-Cintas
344–349
Technical translation
Klaus Schubert
350–355
Terminology and translation
M. Teresa Cabré Castellví
356–365
The turns of Translation Studies
Mary Snell-Hornby
366–370
Think-aloud protocol
Riitta Jääskeläinen
371–373
Transfer and Transfer Studies
Susanne Göpferich
374–377
Translation
Sandra L. Halverson
378–384
Translation ‘errors’
Gyde Hansen
385–388
Translation didactics
Dorothy Kelly
389–396
Translation history
Lieven D’hulst
397–405
Translation process
Birgitta Englund Dimitrova
406–411
Translation strategies and tactics
Yves Gambier
412–418
Translation Studies
Jeremy Munday
419–428
Translation tools
Deborah A. Folaron
429–436
Unit of translation
Michel Ballard
437–440
Voiceover and dubbing
Jorge Díaz-Cintas and Pilar Orero
441–445
Web and translation
Deborah A. Folaron
446–450
“Like the topics in the current volume, future topics will be selected in conjunction with the Translation Studies Bibliography, an online resource, for which Gambier and van Doorslaer also serve as editors. That link enables the editors to draw on their ongoing work with “topical and conceptual maps of the discipline” as they select the areas to be covered in future volumes. [...] There are some incisive, informative pieces here. [...] The Handbook of Translation Studies makes a singular contribution because its link to the Translation Studies Bibliography will afford contributors the possibility of frequent revision and updating.”
“The HTS is a publication which successfully manages to introduce a wide range of topics which are currently being investigated in the field of translation studies to an extremely broad readership. The editors have done a wonderful job of combining the numerous contributions in the handbook in a relatively consistent way and of making the handbook available in a printed version and an online version, the latter of which they intend to keep updated.”
“The Handbook of Translation Studies is definitely a useful volume for those interested in acquiring some understanding of the vast field of research in translation studies. [...] The 'Handbook of Translation Studies (Volume 1)' will indeed be useful to the broad audience of students, scholars and professionals targeted by the publisher. It will serve some as an entry into translation studies as a discipline, whereas for others, it will be the first point of contact with a range of different subfields.”
“The strength of the Handbook lies [...] in how it can be used as a springboard to quickly identify related topics, the most relevant publications, and the scholars who have worked on specific topics. [...] It is an excellent resource for those who would wish to gain a better general understanding of the domain of translation studies, which is, after all, the training ground for many future translators and potential machine translation users.”
“Being so good in so many aspects, this volume, along with other volumes of the Handbook of Translation Studies , is a perfect reference and textbook for different university courses in translation theory and history. Not only does it present various problems of translation and interpreting in a coherent and succinct manner but it also provides references to more detailed studies of particular translation and interpreting issues.
Generally speaking, the variety of the topics discussed, the functionality of the Handbook of Translation Studies as a printed and online project as well as the involvement of so many translation and interpreting scholars in providing entries to the project are all praiseworthy. Without a doubt, this Handbook has a chance of becoming one of the most important sources of information on a variety of topics from translation and interpreting studies and therefore I happily recommend anyone interested in translation and interpreting, regardless of their experience and expertise in this field, familiarising with the project of the Handbook of Translation Studies. This is certainly a must-read volume for all students and beginning translation and interpreting scholars looking for the explanation of key terms of translation studies or for ideas for their own further research. The volume with its rich contents has it all – definitions and discussions of the terms and concepts, supplemented with some comments on how a given issue/concept might be developed/might develop in the future. Obviously, the references included in each entry make it even easier for the readers to find the relevant literature and study a given concept in greater detail.”
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 03 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Terminology & Lexicography

Terminology

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Interpreting
Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2010028104